Tour Assisted Living during the Holidays

December 10, 2018

 

Tax deductions for Senior Care

The holiday season can be a great time to tour assisted living communities with a senior loved one. Here’s what families should know and consider.

If you and a senior loved one have been discussing a move to an assisted living community in the new year, the holidays can be an ideal time to start touring. While some families might be reluctant to broach this subject during the holiday season, there are reasons why they should.

Assisted living communities, like those at Legacy Senior Living, give older adults the support they need to live their best quality of life. An excellent way to learn more about these communities is by visiting in person.

5 Reasons to Visit Assisted Living Communities during the Holidays

Here are a few of the many reasons you and your aging loved one should make time to visit assisted living communities this holiday season:

  1. The halls are decked: Most assisted living communities go all out decorating for the holidays. Residents and their families usually participate in the fun which brings a festive atmosphere to the community.
  2. Seasonal activities abound: While assisted living communities are known for offering life-enrichment activities and wellness programs all year, the holidays are especially inviting. Local youth groups and community organizations often join forces with the staff to host choir programs, music concerts, open houses, game nights, and more. Potential residents can join the fun and get an inside look at what it’s like to live there.
  3. Visiting family can participate: Long-distance family members are often in town during the holiday season. Touring assisted living communities with extended family can give everyone a chance to ask questions and learn more about the options.
  4. Talk with resident families: Family members of residents often visit in greater numbers during the holiday season. This gives you an opportunity to ask them questions about their satisfaction with the community’s care and services. Their insight can be invaluable as you and your loved one try to make an informed decision.
  5. Beat the January rush: January is one of the busiest months of the year for assisted living communities. Families who have put off making this decision often feel a sense of urgency after spending time with a senior loved one during the holidays. Visiting in December allows staff members to spend more time giving tours and answering questions. It will also give your family member first pick of the apartments or suites that are available.

Before visiting your first community, take time to create a list of questions to ask during your tour. Making an informed choice depends on asking the right questions and being satisfied with the answers you receive. “5 Questions to Ask on a Senior Living Community Tour” can help you get your list started!

Is the Senior Driver in Your Family Safe Behind the Wheel?

December 3, 2018

Concerned about senior driver safety? This information will help you objectively assess their skills.

The topic of driving safety can be a contentious one between seniors and those who love them. For many, driving represents independence. Knowing you can hop in your car and head out to appointments and errands allows most of us to feel empowered and in control of our lives.

Unfortunately, aging brings undeniable physical changes, some of which can make driving more difficult. In honor of Older Driver Safety Awareness Week, here are some tips that adult children should know about safety and senior drivers.

Assessing an Older Driver Skills

Adult children sometimes use age as the only factor in determining if a parent is safe behind the wheel. There is evidence to show that age does play a role in driving safety. Senior driver research confirms that fatal accidents begin to rise around the age of 75 and spike significantly at the age of 80.

But age shouldn’t be the primary determinant of driving safety. While aging does cause physical changes, not everyone ages the same. An active 80-year-old may be a safer, better driver than a 60-year-old who lives with a serious health condition.

A few, more objective ways to evaluate an older loved one’s fitness for driving include:

  1. Condition of the vehicle: An older driver’s car can tell a story. Is your senior loved one’s car in good physical shape? Do you see scrapes on the side mirrors and side panels or dents in the fenders? A close inspection of the vehicle can help you spot potential concerns.

Sometimes a senior driver might have a problem with depth perception and not realize it. They may be bumping in to things because they don’t realize how close they are.

  1. Conduct a ride along: Adult children and younger family members often act as a senior’s driver when they head out together. This might keep them from realizing how much the older adult’s driving skills have deteriorated.

Try to discreetly arrange a ride along to see how well the senior performs behind the wheel of their car. It will help to do this during busy traffic times, at dusk, or after dark. Consider the following questions as you observe your loved one’s driving skills.

Is the senior too confident or overly anxious while driving? Are they adhering to the rules of the road? Is looking behind them or over their shoulder difficult or even painful? Are they keeping up with traffic or going too fast or too slow? Each of these factors can impact their safety on the road.

  1. Safe driver evaluation: You can also take advantage of more formal senior-driver safety evaluations. The American Automobile Association (AAA) has a free self-rating tool titled Drivers 65 Plus. This brochure includes 15 questions designed to assess an older adult’s driving skills. If you prefer an in-person approach, a professional driving specialist might be the answer. You can search the American Occupational Therapy Association’s driving specialist database to find a professional near you.

A final suggestion is to make sure your senior loved one has an annual eye exam. Vision loss is more common as we age and can have a significant impact on older driver safety.

Transportation Services at Legacy Senior Living

If your senior loved one decides it is time to hang up the car keys, exploring transportation options together should be a priority. At Legacy Senior Living communities, transportation is one of our most popular services.

Whether it is transportation for a group outing or for a physician appointment, we make it easy for residents to stay connected. Call the Legacy community nearest you to learn more!

Holiday Gifts for an Adult with Alzheimer’s

November 26, 2018

If you are having a tough time coming up with holiday gifts for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia, you’ll likely find this guide to be of help.

If you are struggling to come up with a holiday gift idea for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or a similar form of dementia, know that you aren’t alone. Families want to include senior loved ones in holiday traditions like gift giving while also keeping their safety in mind.

That’s why we created this simple holiday gift guide. We hope it will help spark some ideas for a present that will bring joy to your senior family member.

Holiday Gift Ideas for Adults with Alzheimer’s and Dementia

  1. Music: Music has therapeutic benefits, especially for people with memory loss. It can be soothing, calming, or uplifting depending upon the type of music. As a holiday gift, you can purchase an iPod (or even an iPad) and download some of your loved one’s favorite songs. Vinyl record players are also gaining in popularity again. You could buy one along with a few vinyl records of your senior loved one’s favorite artists from youth.
  2. For the birds: If you are the caregiver or family member of an adult with Alzheimer’s, you may have noticed how captivated they are by birds. Whether it is watching birds build a nest, have lunch at the bird feeder, or enjoy a dip in the bird bath, research shows that people with dementia find peace and comfort in birdwatching. The National Audubon Society launched a special initiative, Bird Tales, to help educate people on the role birding can play in improving the lives of people with Alzheimer’s. Depending upon your loved one’s living situation, you can buy a bird feeder and bird food for them to enjoy. If space doesn’t allow for that, you can purchase a bird feeder that attaches directly to window glass. From the comfort of their living room, seniors can watch the birds eat.
  3. Comfort clothing: As Alzheimer’s disease progresses, it can cause problems with mobility, dexterity, and coordination. This makes it more difficult for people to manage personal care needs independently. You can help by purchasing clothes that are easier to get on and off. Jogging suits, shirts that zip up the front (instead of buttons), jeans with an elastic waistband, and sneakers with a Velcro closure make it easier for a senior with a physical impairment to dress on their own.
  4. Fidget blanket: Another holiday gift that can reduce agitation and anxiety in an adult with Alzheimer’s is a fidget blanket. These are tactile blankets that have ribbons, bows, buttons, hooks, family photos, and more attached. For an adult struggling with anxiety or agitation, having a blanket or quilt with fidget activities built in keeps their hands busy. You can find a variety of sellers on Etsy and a list of people who make fidget quilts on Alzheimer’s Support. If you are crafty and want to make one of your own, you will find instructions on the Patchwork Posse website.

We hope this guide helps you find the perfect holiday gift for your senior loved one.

The Talk: Discussing the Need for Memory Care during the Holidays

The holiday season is generally a time of year when families are reunited. It can provide you with an opportunity to talk about your senior loved one’s care needs now and in the days ahead. Memory care might be a solution that helps your loved one safely live their best quality of life.

We invite you and your family to visit the Legacy Senior Living community nearest you. Our dedicated memory care program, The Harbor, is committed to helping adults with dementia live their best quality of life at every stage of the disease. Call us today to schedule a private tour.

4 Ways to Manage Caregiver Stress during the Holidays

November 19, 2018

Manage Caregiver Stress during the Holidays

The holidays can be especially overwhelming for caregivers. Use these 4 tips to manage caregiver stress during the holidays and enjoy time with loved ones.

The holiday season can be a busy time of year. Shopping, decorating, wrapping gifts, cooking, and hosting parties are traditions for many families. For already overscheduled caregivers, the added demands of the holidays can be especially overwhelming.

Four in ten caregivers say the holidays are too much. They can’t juggle all of the demands their schedule and the season create. But there are ways you can set more realistic expectations and enjoy the holidays this year.

In honor of National Family Caregivers Month, we are sharing a few tips to help manage stress and avoid caregiver burnout.

4 Ways to Prevent Caregiver Burnout during the Holidays

  1. Accept help: Caregivers are often reluctant to ask for or accept help. Give yourself permission to do so this holiday season. Maybe a friend can pick up some of your holiday gifts while they are doing their own shopping. You could ask a family member to stay with your loved one so you can attend a party. If neither of those is an option, respite care might be. Your family member can enjoy a few days at an assisted living community to give you the time to get things done. Then you can relax and enjoy a few holiday festivities.
  2. Think creatively: Instead of trying to do it all alone, think about ways you can accomplish your goals more easily. While you might want to bake holiday cookies, buying them at a local bakery is quicker and easier. Using festive gift bags in lieu of gift wrap is another time saver. You might be accustomed to shopping for gifts online, but you can also shop online for home-delivered meals, wine, and other holiday essentials.
  3. Create new traditions: Setting more realistic expectations is another way to manage caregiver stress during the holidays. That often means adopting new holiday traditions, at least while you are a caregiver. Change a formal sit-down dinner to a potluck. Keep holiday decorations to a minimum. Send a festive holiday email in lieu of a card. This will give you time to truly enjoy the season with the people you love.
  4. Connect with peers: Another way to help manage caregiver stress is by connecting with fellow caregivers. You may find new ideas for navigating the holidays. Many family caregivers find online support groups to be the most convenient way to connect. The National Center on Caregiving’s Family Caregiver Alliance has some you might want to consider. If you are caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or a similar form of dementia, a good online support group is

Resources for Family Caregivers

If you are a caregiver looking for more news and research on caring for a senior loved one, we invite you to bookmark the Legacy Senior Living blog and stop back often. We update our blog every week so you have access to the most current information on aging, caregiving, senior living, and dementia.

How Are Adults Screened for Memory Problems?

November 12, 2018

If you are asking if the changes you see in a senior loved one are typical signs of aging or early signs of Alzheimer’s, you may also wonder how people are screened for memory problems.

If you’ve noticed changes in a senior loved one, you might worry about what could be wrong. Family members often wonder how to distinguish the normal signs of aging from issues that might indicate a more serious problem. The truth is, even experienced physicians sometimes have trouble making that distinction.

Forgetfulness and confusion are classic early warning signs of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia. However, there are other health conditions, some reversible, that can also cause those symptoms. A vitamin deficiency, an infection, or an adverse reaction to a medication can produce symptoms that mimic Alzheimer’s.

If you are concerned about a senior loved one’s health, the best thing to do is schedule an appointment with their primary care physician. He or she will be able to complete a physical and a memory screening test to determine if further testing is necessary.

Screening Tests for Alzheimer’s & Dementia

People are often surprised to discover that no single test will definitively diagnosis Alzheimer’s. Diagnosis is a process of eliminating other potential causes for the symptoms a senior is experiencing. However, there are several screenings that can help health care professionals detect the signs of cognitive changes.

Two of those tests are:

  • Alzheimer’s Clock Test: This is the screening test many physicians use. The doctor will ask their patient to draw a clock on a piece of paper and include the numbers. The patient is then asked to draw the hands that correspond to random times of day, such as 1:25 or 10:15.
  • Mini Cog Test: Another screening exam a physician might use is the mini cog test. It has two parts: a 3-item recall test and a simply scored clock drawing test. While not definitive, it can help a doctor identify potential problems.

If your senior family member won’t allow you to schedule an appointment with their physician, there is another option to consider. The Alzheimer’s Foundation of America has established Memory Screening Sites. Trained professionals administer the confidential tests at no cost. You can search by zip code to find an AFA Memory Screening Site near you.

Finally, there are several tests that can be administered at home. One that is highly regarded is the Self-Administered Gerocognitive Exam (SAGE). This memory screening takes about 15 minutes to download and complete. It can detect the early signs of memory loss or abstract thought impairment.

The Harbor Memory Care at Legacy

If a loved one does receive the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s, it’s important to know that there are a wide variety of resources available to help them live their best life despite the disease. Residents in our state-of-the-art memory care program, The Harbor, benefit from our unique approach to care. Call the community nearest you to arrange a private tour today.

Pets as Therapists: A Relationship That Promotes Healthy Aging

November 7, 2018

In honor of Adopt a Senior Pet Month, Legacy Senior Living shares information on how pets improve older adults’ lives and why you should consider an older pet.

Sharing your life with friends and family who love you unconditionally is increasingly important as we grow older. For many, pets are family. They are a source of companionship and affection, especially for seniors.

Having a pet can give retired adults a sense of purpose after their kids are grown and gone.

In honor of National Adopt a Senior Pet Month, we explore the role pets can play in the lives of seniors and how adopting an older pet might help seniors.

The Benefits of Owning a Pet during Retirement

Older adults who are pet owners enjoy many health benefits. According to the American Heart Association, having an animal to love and care for helps lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Research also shows that seniors who have a pet exercise more and experience less depression.

Other benefits of having a furry companion include:

  • Socialization: Walking a dog is a great way to meet the neighbors and develop new friendships, which is an important part of aging well.
  • Purpose: Having a pet to care for helps seniors develop a healthy daily routine and a sense of purpose. This is especially beneficial for older adults who live alone.
  • Lower stress: The very acts of petting a cat or scratching a dog’s ear can help lower stress. For an older adult with a chronic health condition or someone who is grieving, pets can be very therapeutic.

If you are considering adopting a pet for yourself or a senior loved one, here’s what you should consider.

Adopting a Senior Pet

First, think about the senior’s budget and how much they can realistically spend on a pet each month. Some types of pets are more expensive to maintain. Whether it is grooming expenses for long-haired cats or veterinary bills for animals known to need extra care, be sure you understand the financial costs of any potential pet.

Also consider the animal’s temperament. For example, a high energy dog like a Jack Russell or a Boxer might be too much for an older adult.

Take the senior’s living situation into account as well. A cat might be better for an older adult who has limited outdoor space or doesn’t live near a dog park.

Our final suggestion is to consider adopting an older pet. Local shelters usually struggle to find homes for them even though they generally make great companions. Most are house-trained and calmer than a puppy or kitten.

Many local shelters have websites you can use to learn more about the animals currently up for adoption and the process to become a pet parent.

Life Enrichment at Legacy Senior Living

Helping older adults live their best quality of life is at the heart of everything we do at Legacy Senior Living communities. From life enrichment activities to wellness programs, we invite you to visit the Legacy community nearest you to learn more today.

How to Evaluate a Memory Care Program for a Loved One

October 22, 2018

How to evaluate a memory care program

Use these tips to help you evaluate a memory care program for a senior loved one who has dementia. From licensing to life enrichment, we help you know what to look for.

A diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or a similar form of dementia can be devastating for an older adult and the people who love them. As the disease advances and families have difficulty managing their loved one’s care at home, the need for specialized support often arises. Memory care programs help seniors with dementia live the best quality of life.

Finding a quality memory care program that allows seniors with dementia to feel independent and empowered is important. Here are a few factors to consider as you evaluate a memory care program in a senior living community.

3 Tips to Evaluate a Memory Care Program

  1. Check licensing and survey results

Memory care assisted living communities are licensed at the state level and regulations vary from state to state. You can learn how well a memory care community fared during their state inspection by visiting your state’s Department of Aging online. Here you will find copies of inspection reports and any family complaints. If your state doesn’t publish survey results online, ask the community to review theirs.

  1. Pay attention to the details

As you visit each memory care community, try to get a feel for how well the staff and residents seem to interact. Also pay attention to how the atmosphere feels. Are soft, kind voices used? Are interactions positive and encouraging?

You might ask other residents’ families you encounter how they feel about the community and if it’s been a good solution for their loved one.

During your tour, it’s also important to ask about life enrichment programs and wellness activities that are specific to residents with memory loss. A good quality life enrichment program will help residents with memory loss feel good about themselves despite their disease. Ask to see a copy of the resident calendar and have a life enrichment staff member go through it with you.

  1. Explore security programs

Wandering is an issue for many adults with dementia. In fact, it’s often cited as the leading reason families seek the support of a memory care community. Ask the staff to review the safety measures that are in place to prevent residents from wandering away.

While no one likes to think the worst will happen, it unfortunately does on very rare occasions. Ask the staff what their procedure is should a resident with dementia go missing.

Visit The Harbor at Legacy Senior Living

At Legacy Senior Living, we call our memory care program The Harbor. From our Purposeful Day approach to our homelike setting, The Harbor is a nationally recognized and highly acclaimed program. We invite you to get a firsthand look at our memory care program by calling the community nearest you to schedule a private tour!

Fire Prevention and the Fire Risks Older Adults Face

October 15, 2018

October is Fire Prevention Month.

October is Fire Prevention Month. Use these prevention measures to help a senior loved one lower their risk of being harmed in a fire.

October is Fire Prevention Month. If you are a caregiver for a family elder or senior friend, you might be surprised to learn how frightening the statistics surrounding fires and older adults are. Older adults are at two times greater risk for being seriously injured or losing their life in a fire. While seniors account for only 13% of the country’s population, 35% of fire-related deaths are seniors.

To help raise awareness during Fire Prevention Month, the team at Legacy Senior Living is sharing steps you can take to protect an older loved one from being harmed in a fire.

5 Fire Safety Measures to Protect Older Adults

  1. Space heater hazards: Older adults who have poor circulation or take blood thinner medications may feel cold when others don’t. It can prompt them to use small electric space heaters in their bedroom, bathroom, and living room. While space heaters can help warm the air surrounding the senior, they should be used with caution. Read and follow the instructions to prevent fires. One of the warnings you’ll likely find is to make sure the space heater has at least a three-foot clearance on all sides to avoid a fire.
  2. Kitchen fire concerns: A fire prevention expert will no doubt tell you that most home fires begin in the kitchen, with cooking being the leading cause. You can help your senior loved one avoid a kitchen fire by helping them establish a method of reminding them they have something cooking if they leave the room. It might be as simple as taking a spatula with them. A device like CookStop turns the burner off if movement in the kitchen isn’t detected for a predetermined amount of time. Kitchen clothing and towels can also present a hazard. Seniors should also avoid loose-fitting sleeves that can brush up against a burner and ignite.
  3. Extension cord risks: Seniors often live in the same home for decades. Older homes frequently have fewer electrical outlets than newer homes, leading to greater use of extension cords to connect all of today’s modern devices. While it may be convenient, it might overload a circuit and cause a fire. It can also present a fall risk for a senior who may trip over the cords.
  4. Smoke detector function: Make certain the older adults in your life have working smoke detectors in their homes. Fire experts say at least one smoke detector should be installed on every floor of the home. Have detectors for fire and for smoke. Check the batteries often to make sure they are working. If your loved one has hearing loss, some models of smoke detectors use a strobe light to flash an alert.
  5. Escape planning: Seniors often have slower reflexes and mobility issues that can slow down their escape in the event of a fire. That’s why it’s important to create an escape plan just in case. Help your senior loved one practice several routes for escaping from different rooms in their home in case a fire breaks out.

If you would like to learn more about fire prevention and senior safety, this free publication, Fire Safety Checklist, was developed by FEMA and the U.S. Fire Administration.

Emergency Preparedness at Legacy Communities

At Legacy Senior Living communities throughout the southeast, we take emergency preparedness very seriously. From fire prevention to storm safety awareness, we plan for the unexpected. We invite you to tour the community nearest you and ask our team to share their emergency preparedness plans with you. It will give you peace of mind knowing your loved one is in good hands if they move to a Legacy community.

Helping a Parent Prepare for Medicare Open Enrollment

October 8, 2018

Medicare open enrollment

Navigating your way through Medicare open enrollment can be confusing. Use this information to help you learn more and get started.

Medicare’s open enrollment period has arrived! As of October 15, seniors and others who participate in Medicare can make changes to their existing coverage. If you are an adult child helping an aging parent navigate their way through this process for the first time, it can be daunting. Many adult children feel anxious, overwhelmed, and fearful that they will make a bad decision.

We thought it would be helpful to the residents of Legacy Senior Living communities and the older adults who follow our blog if we shared a few tips for making the most of Medicare Open Enrollment.

What to Know About Medicare Open Enrollment

Q: How long can we make changes and what are the dates for Medicare Open Enrollment?

A: Medicare Open Enrollment is the same every year: October 15 through December 7. While that might seem like a generous time frame, it can go quickly when you are exploring your options. Be sure to start early and give yourself plenty of time.

Q: If I make changes on my parent’s behalf, when do they take effect?

A: Changes made during open enrollment go into effect on January 1 of the following year.

Q: What is Medicare Advantage Plan?

A: Medicare Advantage Plans are offered by private health insurance companies. These plans fall under a senior’s Medicare Part C benefit. Insurance companies contract with Medicare to provide health care services to seniors.

Some of these plans offer very cost-effective solutions for older adults with benefits that might extend to prescription coverage or even hearing aids. It’s important to do your research, however, as these plans can vary widely.

Q: Do Medicare recipients who are satisfied with their current coverage need to do anything?

A: Unless you indicate otherwise, your current coverage will be automatically renewed. There are a few steps to take to ensure that your plan or your parent’s plan will remain the same. That includes checking to be sure current physicians, pharmacies, hospitals, and outpatient centers will still participate. Remember, some providers opt out of our plans and even traditional Medicare.

Carefully review the “Evidence of Coverage” (EOC) and “Annual Notice of Change” (ANOC) documents you or your parent received in the mail. These notices will list any plan changes for the upcoming coverage year.

Q: Where can I learn more about plans and coverage in my parent’s area?

A: You can use Medicare.gov to search for options near you or your parent. If you would prefer to talk to someone by phone, call 1-800-MEDICARE (633-4227) for help.

Finally, every state has personal help available, but you will need to contact them early as their schedules are busy during the open enrollment period. Find the contact information for your state here.

Busting the Dangerous Myths about Flu Shots and Seniors

October 1, 2018

Flu shot myths often keep people from being vaccinated. For older adults, that can be especially dangerous. Here’s what you should know.

Every fall, old flu shot myths—and a few new ones—begin to make the rounds. Recent false social media posts have gone as far as to say flu shots are linked to the development of Alzheimer’s disease among older adults! It’s misinformation like this that may prevent seniors from getting a flu shot.

While younger, healthy adults may be able to fight off the virus, older adults who have a chronic health condition or a weakened immune system might not. For seniors, the flu can be deadly. During a typical flu season, seniors account for 70 to 85 percent of flu-related deaths, and 50 to 70 percent of hospitalizations for influenza.

Let’s bust a few more common myths about flu shots.

Protecting Seniors from the Flu: Common Flu Shots Myths

Myth #1: Flu shots contain an active flu virus

People of all ages have the misperception that the flu shot works by exposing you to a small dose of the flu. This persistent myth says that by being exposed to a small dose of flu, you build your immunity against it.

For older adults trying to stay healthy, the idea of being exposed to even a minor case of the flu may be frightening. That’s why it’s important to help seniors understand that this is a myth. An influenza vaccine contains only an inactive strain of the flu. You can’t get the flu from the flu shot.

Myth #2: Only seniors and children need a flu shot

This myth can put older adults at risk of getting the flu. While young adults and healthy middle-aged people might not think they need a flu shot, it’s a measure that helps prevent them from spreading the flu.

Adult children of an aging parent and family caregivers especially need to protect themselves against the flu. They can unwittingly spread the virus to immune-compromised seniors without even being aware they have it.

Myth #3: If you get a flu shot too early, you won’t be protected all season

Some adults delay getting vaccinated until mid-winter when the flu begins to make an appearance. Many do so because they believe receiving the vaccine too early will prevent them from being protected all flu season.

The truth is, a flu shot typically offers protection for a whole year. The immunity doesn’t wear off in a month or two. You are better off getting the vaccine early before the flu begins to make its way around town.

Myth #4: Because the flu shot doesn’t change much, you don’t need it every year

Each new flu season heralds a new strain of the flu. While some years might be similar, they are rarely ever the same. Researchers adapt vaccines to target those changes so people are protected against the strains expected to be bad that season.

Help Seniors Get Accurate Information on Flu Shots

In an average flu season, 200,000 people are hospitalized for the flu, and 36,000 people die from it. Older adults account for the majority of these. You can help protect the seniors in your life by educating them on the importance of the flu vaccine and encouraging them to be vaccinated.

Interested in more information about health and well-being for older adults? Visit “Aging Well” on the Legacy Senior Living blog. We share the latest news and research throughout the month on living an active, independent life as you grow older.