How Senior Mentors Benefit from Helping Others

March 18, 2019

Senior mentor programs benefit older adults and the younger generation alike. Learn more about mentoring programs and how to connect with one near you.

Retirement is a time in life when older adults are typically free to recreate themselves. Some pursue a new hobby or even launch a new business. Others find themselves immersed in volunteering their time to a cause they believe in. Many times, this includes organizations that work with children or young adults. Senior mentors are one example.

Mentors are older adults who share their talent with the younger generation for an extended period of time. Senior mentors have been particularly active as tutors for school-aged children and guiding young adults in career advancement.

Here are a few ways senior mentor programs can make a positive difference in the lives of both generations.

4 Benefits of Senior Mentorship Programs

  1. Reduce loneliness: Loneliness and isolation are all too common among older adults. Mentor programs give seniors an opportunity to connect with others in productive ways. But older adults aren’t the only ones who experience loneliness. Children and young adults may also struggle with it, especially if they don’t have strong family ties. Senior mentors can help the younger generation feel comfortable with elders and develop healthier attitudes about aging while also providing companionship.
  2. Reduce ageism: It’s common for people to socialize within their own age group. Parents develop friendships with parents their children play with. Young adults hang out with school friends. Seniors spend time with people who belong to their retiree groups. This form of segregation can lead to generational stereotypes. Senior mentorship programs cross age boundaries and help the generations learn to appreciate each other in new ways. This can help to reduce ageism.
  3. Opportunity to learn: Another advantage to intergenerational relationships is the mutual learning opportunities they create. Seniors have wisdom that comes from life experience. Mentor programs allow them to share that knowledge with children and young adults. Seniors can also learn from younger generations. Whether it is teaching a senior to master technology or how to use social media, kids have knowledge to share too.
  4. Builds community: Intergenerational mentoring programs can help improve entire communities. They promote cohesion, save taxpayers money, and build bridges across generations. All of these benefits help to create healthy, thriving communities.

How to Find a Senior Mentor Program

Various mentoring programs around the country give people the opportunity to connect with other generations.

Life Enrichment at Legacy Senior Living Communities

At Legacy Senior Living communities, you will find an abundance of life enrichment opportunities. From activities and workshops to volunteer programs, residents have all the support they need to live a meaningful, engaged life. We invite you to schedule a tour of the community nearest you to learn more!

How to Get a Senior’s Home Ready for a Quick, Profitable Sale

March 11, 2019

quick, profitable sale

Are you getting ready to sell yours or a senior loved one’s home? Here are six tips for a quick, profitable sale.

Preparing to sell your home or the home of a senior loved one can be intimidating. Since most older adults who are moving to a senior living community need the proceeds from a home sale to help finance their transition, getting a quick, profitable sale is important.

If your family is getting ready to sell, these 6 tips can help you make a quick, profitable sale.

6 Tips to Get the Best Price on the Sale of a Senior’s Home

  1. Downsize and declutter: If a senior has lived in their home for a long time, they’ve likely acquired a lot of belongings. When rooms look cluttered, it can make the house appear smaller. Take time to go room-by-room to downsize and declutter. Pack up items that are no longer needed or donate them to a charity.
  2. Clean and freshen up: First impressions are important when it comes to selling a house. That’s true for both the interior and exterior. Trim the shrubs, give the front door a new coat of paint if it looks drab, plant a few pots of colorful flowers, and freshen up the mulch. Clean the carpets and flooring, scrub the bathrooms, and make sure the kitchen is sparkling.
  3. Make minor repairs: Replacing broken lights, fixing leaky faucets, and taking care of other minor repairs is important too. It sends a signal that the house has been well-cared-for. This can give potential buyers peace of mind.
  4. Set the right price: Many sellers have a sentimental attachment to their home. It can result in setting a price that is too high for market conditions. When a home is overpriced, it discourages potential buyers from looking or making an offer. This can not only slow down the selling process, but also result in the home going for a lower price when it does sell. Setting a realistic price sometimes triggers a bidding war among buyers that may help sell the home for more than list price.
  5. Pack up personal items: A seller’s personal touches make the house a home, but these can also make it more difficult for potential buyers to picture themselves living there. Before listing the house, remove personal items from the home, such as family photos and other mementos.
  6. Be flexible about showings: Be willing to let the home be shown on short notice, or during early mornings or dinnertime. While it might not be convenient, it can allow potential buyers who work to see the home. Whenever possible, the senior should leave the home when a realtor is showing the house. This makes it less awkward for everyone involved.

Preparing for a New Chapter in Life

Moving is tough at any age, but planning for the transition can help reduce stress and anxiety. If you or an older loved one are considering a move to a senior community in the southeast, we hope you will keep Legacy Senior Living in mind.

With communities in six states, we likely have an option near you. Call us today at (423) 478-8071 to learn more!

Are Generic Drugs a Safe Way for Seniors to Save Money?

March 4, 2019

generic drugs, open bottle of pills

Generic drugs are just one of the ways older adults can save money on prescriptions.

For older adults on a budget, the idea of saving money on medications can be enticing. From making trips to Canada or Mexico where medication is significantly less expensive to taking lower doses than a physician prescribes, seniors go to great lengths to save money on prescriptions.

One idea that often yields questions is generic drugs. They are less expensive than brand-name prescriptions, but older adults often worry that they aren’t as effective. According to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), 90 percent of prescriptions that are filled in this country are for generic drugs.

Most insurance companies require the use of generic medications unless a physician specifically requests otherwise. Even then the patient and physician may be required to file an appeal.

What are the Differences between Brand-Name Drugs and Generics?

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says people should feel confident that a generic drug is just as effective as a brand-name medication used for the same purpose. Before the FDA approves a generic drug, it must meet the following criteria:

  • Contain the same active ingredients at the same strength as the brand-name drug
  • Reach the required level in the bloodstream in the same amount of time and to the same extent
  • Be utilized for the same purpose and effect
  • Meet the same testing standards
  • Come in the same form (pill, inhaler, liquid)

What can be different are the color, shape, size, and packaging of a generic drug. But those differences aren’t likely to cause any issues for the older adults who take them.

Preservatives and flavorings may also differ, and that is where people sometimes run into problems. A senior with allergies or sensitivities to additives and preservatives, such as gluten, might develop a reaction to a generic drug that doesn’t occur in a brand-name prescription.

How Can Seniors Save Money on Prescription Medications?

Besides generic drugs, there are a few other avenues seniors can explore to save money on medication.

  • Manufacturer discount coupons: Some drug companies, especially for medications new to the market, offer physicians discount coupons to share with patients. They might also make the coupons available on the manufacturer’s website.
  • Pharmacy savings cards: While it might be hard to believe, some prescriptions are actually less expensive to pay for outright than to pay for using insurance. Many times, that is because the pharmacy has a savings card to help clients. The catch to filling a prescription without using your insurance card is that the cost doesn’t count towards meeting your deductible.
  • Comparison shop: Prescription drug costs vary from pharmacy to pharmacy. You can use GoodRx to instantly determine which of your local pharmacies offer the best price for each of your prescriptions.
  • Mail-order prescriptions: Many insurance providers offer a mail-order service for filling prescriptions in larger volumes. In addition to saving money, the senior won’t have to worry about getting to the pharmacy to pick up a prescription.
  • Physician samples: If your physician is prescribing a new medication, ask if they have samples available. This allows you to try the medication and make sure you won’t have a reaction to it before you spend any money.
  • Assistance programs: You can also use Benefits CheckUp from the National Council on Aging to see if you qualify for assistance. It will help identify local, state, and federal programs that can aid in paying for medications.

Medication Management for Older Adults

One challenge seniors experience is how to safely manage multiple medications. From taking the right dosage at the right time to remembering when to order a refill, mistakes with medication management are the reason many older adults end up in the hospital emergency room.

At Legacy Senior Living communities, residents get the support they need to stay safely on track with medication. Call the community nearest you to learn more about our medication reminder program.

5 Advantages of Virtual Physician Visit Services

February 25, 2019

As technology improves, more physicians are offering virtual office visits. Here are 5 advantages of virtual physician visit services.

Getting to and from a physician’s office can be challenging for older adults, especially those who live in rural communities or those who’ve given up driving. Many are reluctant to ask a busy adult child for help and aren’t aware of other transportation options. For some seniors, it is a barrier to getting the care they need when they need it.

One option that has been growing in recent years is virtual physician visits. As the technology improves and is easier for seniors to use, the number of physicians offering this service has grown. Insurance companies are seeing the value of virtual visits and including them in their list of covered services.

There are issues to be aware of if you are a senior considering virtual physician visits or the adult child of one. Here’s what older adults and their families should consider.

5 Advantages of Virtual Physician Visit Services

  1. Convenience: Being able to have a face-to-face conversation with a physician from the comfort of your living room is appealing to many. As technology becomes easier to use, even those seniors who aren’t experienced computer users will likely find this service to be convenient.
  2. More focused physician-patient interaction: Physicians are busy professionals, sometimes so busy that patients feel they aren’t being listened to. The doctor might be distracted by other office personnel and patients. Those who have utilized virtual visits often cite the advantage of their doctor’s attention. When it is just the patient and the physician talking by video conference, a doctor can focus more effectively.
  3. No exposure to viruses: Physician waiting rooms are full of sick people. That can expose an older adult, who may have a weaker immune system, to bugs and viruses. Visiting your physician virtually eliminates that risk.
  4. Less time spent waiting: Physicians are notorious for running behind schedule. That leaves patients stuck sitting in the waiting room with nothing to do. It can be stressful and aggravating. When you are waiting for your virtual visit, however, you can relax in the comfort of your own home.
  5. Easier access to specialists: Patients often want to seek a second opinion when they are diagnosed with a health condition. That can be difficult to do for people who live in rural communities. With the help of technology, a patient in Nebraska can meet with a physician in New York virtually to receive advice.

Other Factors to Consider

While virtual physician visits have many advantages, there are a few other factors to consider and ask questions about:

  • How easy is the technology to set up and use? If the senior runs in to problems, how will they go about finding assistance?
  • Does the older adult’s insurance or Medicare pay for virtual visits? If not, how much is the out-of-pocket charge?
  • Is the older adult’s internet connection strong enough? For seniors in rural communities, a lack of good internet options might make virtual visits challenging.

Transportation Provided at Legacy Senior Living

One of the most popular services used by residents of Legacy Senior Living is transportation. Seniors and their families have peace of mind knowing our communities can arrange transportation to and from physician offices. Call the Legacy community nearest you to learn more about this vital resident service.

Wandering Safety Technology for a Senior with Alzheimer’s

February 18, 2019

Wandering Safety Technology for People with Alzheimer’s Disease

If a senior you care for has Alzheimer’s disease, wandering safety technology, like a GPS tracking device, can help keep them becoming lost.

If you are the caregiver for an older adult who has Alzheimer’s, you know firsthand how difficult the disease can be to manage. Keeping an adult with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia safe, can result in long, stressful days for family members. It’s a situation an estimated 16.1 million people find themselves in.

One of the most difficult challenges of caring for a person with Alzheimer’s is managing wandering. This is an important issue to learn more about because 6 in 10 people with the disease will wander. If an adult wanders once, it increases the risk they will do so again.

Fortunately, there are technology solutions that can help. Most of these rely on various forms of GPS tracking.

Wandering Safety Technology for People with Alzheimer’s Disease

The statistics on wandering demonstrate how vital the first 24 hours are for the safe return of a person with Alzheimer’s disease. If a senior is missing longer than 24 hours, the odds of a safe return begin to decline significantly.

A GPS tracking device gives caregivers peace of mind. Should their senior loved one wander, they can be located more quickly. A few devices to investigate include:

  • AngelSense: This GPS cell phone system allows caregivers to receive updates on their loved one’s location every ten seconds. It can also alert caregivers if the senior wanders in to an unfamiliar area. AngelSense has two-way voice technology to allow the older adult and their family member to talk back and forth.
  • GPS SmartSole: A wearable but discrete technology, this GPS tracking option is an insert that is placed in the senior’s shoe. It logs and tracks the older adult’s location using cellular technology. This allows the caregiver to quickly locate their loved one in the event of an emergency.
  • PocketFinder: Another discrete device, this one is small enough to be placed in the senior’s pocket. It is a personal GPS that allows you to track an older adult’s location in real time. That’s important when a senior has dementia and might not be able to speak for themselves to ask for help.

Memory Care for Adults with Alzheimer’s Disease

Sometimes the needs of a senior with Alzheimer’s disease are too much for families to safely manage at home. When that happens, a memory care community can be an ideal solution. These secure programs are designed to keep residents with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia safe, including from wandering away.

They are also designed to allow residents to live their best quality of life despite their disease. From dedicated dining programs that promote good nutrition to life enrichment programs that keep residents engaged, memory care communities empower residents while giving loved ones peace of mind.

At Legacy Senior Living, we call our memory care services The Harbor. With a homelike setting and attentive staff, residents are expertly cared for each day. If you are searching for a memory care community to support a senior in your life, we encourage you to call the Legacy Senior Living community nearest you today to schedule a private tour.

Family Feuds and Caregiving: How to Manage the Disagreements

February 11, 2019

Family feuds often occur when a senior loved one’s health is declining. Use these tips to navigate difficult family dynamics.

When a senior loved one’s health begins to decline, it can create uncomfortable family dynamics. This is especially true when it comes to adult children. One child may want to take a proactive approach to planning for a parent’s future care, while another may be in denial about the situation. The struggle can bring unresolved family feuds to the surface again.

Many families find themselves bickering over finances and how to provide care for a parent. Adult children often disagree about who will manage specific tasks, and where a parent will live as they grow older. A sibling who lives closest to the parent might feel that their out-of-town siblings aren’t helping like they should.

Finding productive ways to manage these difficult conflicts and doing what is best for the aging parent is vital.

5 Ways Siblings Can Manage Disagreements over a Senior’s Care

  1. Put a parent’s wishes first: If your senior loved one is able to express their wishes, ask them what they want. Don’t make assumptions without seeking their input whenever possible.
  2. Be respectful but firm: If your bossy older brother isn’t pulling his weight when it comes to caring for your parent, it may be tempting to let your temper get the best of you. While you might feel better in the short term, it won’t help over the long run. Make a list of your parent’s needs and ask him which specific tasks he will help with and when. If he won’t pitch in or doesn’t follow through, ask him to hire an outside caregiver to give the siblings who are providing care a break.
  3. Keep communicating: Try to promote communication between siblings. Update one another about changes in your parent and their care needs. If one sibling is acting as the primary caregiver, another one should assume responsibility for keeping everyone informed. This might be via Skype or FaceTime or by using a caregiver app.
  4. Utilize respite care: Stress and sleep deprivation caused by caregiving can make family feuds peak. One way to prevent that is to take advantage of respite care programs at local senior living communities. Your parent can stay for a few days or a few weeks to give adult children and spouses time to restore their well-being.
  5. Seek unbiased mediation: It’s an unfortunate reality that some families might not be able to agree on how to provide for a senior loved one. For those families, an elder care mediator might be a good solution. These professionals are knowledgeable about local support options and can aid families in creating a plan for a senior’s future. You can search the National Care Planning Council’s website to find an elder care mediator near you.

Learn More about Senior Living

If you aren’t quite sure what type of care a senior loved one might need, we’d be happy to help. From assisted living to memory care, the teams at Legacy Senior Living communities will be happy to answer your questions. Call the community nearest you today!

Are Lifestyle Choices Impacting Your Risk for Heart Disease?

February 4, 2019

 lower your risk for heart disease

Can lifestyle choices lower your risk for heart disease? Researchers say it can. Use these tips to lower your risk for heart disease.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Despite all of the advances in medicine, cardiac-related illnesses claim more lives than any other disease or medical condition. Estimates are that one in four deaths can be attributed to heart disease.

But researchers say it doesn’t have to be this way. Many of the risk factors for heart disease can be controlled with lifestyle modifications. In honor of National Heart Month, here is a list of steps you can take to lower your risk for heart disease.

Lifestyle Choices that Lower Your Risk for Heart Disease

  • Kick the habit: Smoking is one of the leading causes of heart disease. One out of five heart-related deaths in this country can be attributed to cigarette smoking. If you are a smoker, do your heart a favor and stop.
  • Stay active: A sedentary lifestyle or a lack of exercise also raises the risk for heart disease. You can manage that by exercising at least 150 minutes a week and avoid sitting for long periods of time.
  • Skip processed foods: Americans eat a lot of packaged and processed foods. While they are convenient when the days are busy, these types of foods are typically high in sodium. Too much sodium increases blood pressure putting you at a higher risk for cardiac-related illnesses.
  • Eat a healthy breakfast: Leaving the house without eating a healthy breakfast increases the likelihood that you will binge on unhealthy fare later. Foods like doughnuts and pastries are high in saturated fat and low in protein. Opt for a well-balanced breakfast high in fiber and protein, such as a bowl of oatmeal or a smoothie.
  • Get a good night’s rest: Many people underestimate the importance of sleep. Too little sleep increases the chance of making bad choices during the day, such as eating the wrong foods or sitting too much. Most health experts recommend seven-to-nine hours of sleep each night.
  • Eat sweets in moderation: Elevated blood sugar levels have been linked to heart disease, especially among women. The American Heart Association recommends limiting added sugars in your diet to six teaspoons per day for women and nine teaspoons per day for men.
  • Limit alcohol consumption: Many people are surprised to learn that consuming too much alcohol can also put you at risk for heart disease. While some studies show red wine may be good for your heart, moderation is the key. Talk with your physician for a recommendation on how much alcohol is acceptable based on your personal medical history.
  • Manage daily stress: While it’s unrealistic to think you can completely eliminate stress from your life, finding healthy ways to manage stress is important for your heart. Walking, swimming, meditating, Pilates, and yoga are a few methods to try.
  • Drink green tea: Another way to keep your heart healthy is drinking green tea every day. Researchers say green tea may help manage LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, which are both risk factors for heart disease.
  • Find a doctor you trust: Having a close relationship with a physician can help you manage your overall health and well-being, including your heart. You are more likely to stay on track with preventative tests and screenings if you are comfortable with your physician.
  • Learn about Blue Zones: There are areas around the globe where people live longer, healthier lives. They are referred to as Blue Zones. People who live in these areas have lower incidences of heart disease and Alzheimer’s.
  • Get organized: When your life and home are cluttered and disorganized, you are more likely to feel stressed and even depressed. By getting clutter under control and organizing your life, you reduce stress and improve your well-being.
  • Learn to journal: Keeping a daily journal, one that you use to document the day’s ups and downs, is another heart-healthy step you can take. If you are a caregiver, it can be an especially effective tool for managing caregiver stress.

To learn more about heart health, we encourage you to visit the American Heart Association online. You’ll find a variety of heart-related resources that range from recipes to research projects.

Follow the Legacy Senior Living Blog

If you are an older adult or the caregiver for one, you will find the Legacy Senior Living Blog to be a good resource. Throughout the month we share tips and news related to aging well, caregiving, senior living, and more. We encourage you to bookmark the blog and stop back often!

Is It Time to Consider Assisted Living?

January 28, 2019

6 Signs a Senior Needs Assisted Living

Are you wondering if it is time for a senior in your family to move to assisted living? These six signs that an older adult is struggling can help you decide.

A question we often receive from the families of seniors is how to tell when it’s time for a move to assisted living. While some older adults are excited to move to a community that offers many opportunities for friendship and life enrichment activities, others are more reluctant to make a change.

If this is a question your family is grappling with, we can help. Finding an answer starts with recognizing the warning signs that might indicate a senior is struggling at home.

6 Signs a Senior Needs Assisted Living

  1. Change in personal hygiene: Have your parent’s personal hygiene habits declined? Is their appearance not quite as tidy as in the past? Are they wearing clothes that are not appropriate for the season or the time of day? These may seem like inconsequential details, but they aren’t. A marked decline in personal care can be a sign an older adult is having difficulty keeping up.
  2. Unintended weight gain or weight loss: Another sign a senior might benefit from a move to an assisted living community is if they are gaining or losing weight. This change may be due to a poor diet. Because cooking for one often seems like too much work, an older adult might skip meals or rely on fast food and convenience foods. Another reason is that they’ve given up driving and are having difficulty getting to and from the grocery store often enough.
  3. Errors with medication: Seniors may take several different types of medication each day. This can increase their risk for medication errors. According to Pharmacy Times, almost half of the two-billion prescriptions filled each year are incorrectly taken. Check to see if your loved one is on track by comparing the number of pills left in their medication bottles with the number prescribed. Having too many or too few left can indicate a problem.
  4. Making money mistakes: Another red flag that a senior is struggling is making mistakes with finances. A few signs that indicate an older adult is having difficulty managing their finances include phone calls from creditors, a stack of past-due bills, or a senior unable to identify credit card charges.
  5. Decline in housekeeping: The condition of a senior’s home can also tell a tale. If your parent’s home has always been neat and in good repair, a disheveled, dirty house isn’t a good sign. Check their refrigerator for expired foods. Notice if trash or laundry are piled up. Also, look for neglected maintenance tasks, such as burned-out light bulbs or a leaky faucet.
  6. Withdrawing from social activities: Stepping back from favorite volunteer projects and giving up going to church or synagogue are other warning signs. Sometimes withdrawal is due to a lack of transportation, but other times it can be a sign of cognitive change. For example, isolated seniors are at a higher risk for depression.

These are just a few of the most common signs that a senior is struggling and could benefit from assisted living. If you are still wondering if assisted living is the right choice, we’ll be happy to help you understand all of your senior care options. Call the Legacy Senior Living community nearest you to learn more.

What is Reminiscence Therapy for Adults with Alzheimer’s?

January 21, 2019

reminiscence therapy for adults with Alzheimer’s

If a senior you love has Alzheimer’s disease, reminiscence therapy can help them reconnect with happy memories.

When a senior loved one has Alzheimer’s disease, family members may struggle to find ways to help them feel engaged and connected to the world around them. Short-term memory is often affected early in the disease process, leaving the senior feeling isolated and alone. That’s where programs like Reminiscence Therapy can help.

Reminiscence Therapy (RT) is based on the idea that recalling happy memories helps families to bond and allows a senior to relive positive experiences from the past.

It works because it doesn’t rely on the individual’s impaired short-term memory. The practice of reminiscence utilizes long-term memory that might still be intact. Researchers believe this therapy can help reduce anxiety and depression among adults with dementia.

We have a few ideas to help you utilize Reminiscence Therapy at home.

Utilizing Reminiscence Therapy with a Senior Loved One

  • Ask long-time friends and family members to share copies of old photographs. Explain that your goal is to help your loved one reconnect with photos that will elicit happy memories.
  • Think about what other items may trigger positive memories. Was your loved one a teacher? Put together a box of supplies they may have used for teaching, such as a ruler, a small chalkboard, and an assignment journal.
  • Music is another avenue for connecting with the past. Create a play list of your family member’s favorite music from their youth. Talk about the artists who sang each song and the memories they recall when listening.
  • Like music, old movies are another way to reminisce. Find DVDs of some old classics that you can watch together. It might be fun to include younger members of the family too!
  • Aromatherapy doesn’t always have to be a fancy diffuser and essential oils. Baking can also trigger recollections of happy times. For example, the smell of an apple pie or pecan rolls in the oven may help a senior remember pleasant memories with a parent or grandparent.

Memory Care at Legacy Senior Living

At Legacy Senior Living communities, we’ve earned a reputation for excellence in caring for adults with Alzheimer’s and related forms of dementia. In our memory care communities, called The Harbor, we are committed to helping each resident live their best quality of life.

From a home-like setting to thoughtfully planned meals, we invite you to schedule a personal tour to learn more. Call the Legacy community nearest you to set up a time today!

What to Consider Before Becoming a Power of Attorney (POA) for a Loved One

January 14, 2019

Read this important information before agreeing to become a power of attorney (POA) for a friend or family member.

An important legal document for older adults to have is a power of attorney, often referred to as a POA. It allows you to designate someone to act on your behalf if you are unable to make decisions for yourself.

There are four basic POA categories:

  • General Power of Attorney: Awards a designee wide-ranging power, such as the authority to pay bills or hire and pay an in-home caregiver.
  • Special Power of Attorney: Can be granted for a specific, one-time purpose. For example, to sign home purchase paperwork, if you will be out-of-state, or to sell a car if you can’t be there to handle the sale.
  • Health Care Power of Attorney: Gives a person you designate authority to make health-related decisions on your behalf if you are unable to do so.
  • Durable Power of Attorney: A provision that ensures your wishes are maintained and the authority of your POA is honored in the event you become mentally incapacitated.

If a senior in your life asks you to act as a POA, it might be tempting to agree without considering what the role really entails. But there are important details to think through before you accept a request to become a POA for a friend or family member.

Are You the Best Person to be a POA?

Here are a few factors to understand about POA responsibilities:

  • Do you live close enough to quickly get to the senior’s home in the event of an emergency?
  • Are you comfortable making tough decisions? This is especially important for those who will be a health care POA.
  • Do you feel at ease managing or overseeing financial affairs? A POA will often need to assist with bill paying, asset liquidation, and overall financial support.
  • While this one may be tough to consider, family dynamics can make accepting a POA role too difficult. When families can’t agree, hiring an attorney or other professional to fulfill the POA role might be better.
  • If you know your loved one’s wishes aren’t shared by other family members, will you be strong enough to stand up to peer pressure? A POA’s job is to make sure the senior’s directives are followed.
  • Is your health good enough to take on these responsibilities? Many POAs aren’t required to act very often. But in the event of a crisis, the role can become very demanding so it is important to consider your health before accepting.

Financing Senior Living

One task a POA might be called to assist with is selecting a senior living community and creating a budget to finance it. “Financing Your Retirement” is a resource we created to help you learn more.

We cover options from the Aid & Attendance program for veterans to exploring life care funding. If you have additional questions, please call us at (423) 478-8071. We’ll be happy to help you find the answers you need!