What to Consider Before Moving Your Aging Parent in With You

August 27, 2018

6 tips for talking about assisted living

Thinking of moving your aging parent in to your home? Here are a few factors to consider before you make a move.

More adult children are finding themselves stepping in to the role of caregiver for an aging parent. For many busy families, it often becomes a challenge to manage a loved one’s care while also maintaining your own separate household. It often leads adult children to explore the feasibility of moving a parent in with them. While it might be a great solution for some families, it isn’t for everyone.

How can you decide if moving your aging parent in with you is a viable option?

We have a few suggestions on what you should consider before you make this move.

4 Factors to Consider Before Moving Your Aging Parent in to Your Home

  1. Is your home any safer than your parent’s home?

An adult child might think that because their home is newer and more people will be around that their parent is safer living with them. But are they really?

Take an honest look at your own home’s physical environment and your family’s lifestyle.

Does your home have a lot of stairs? Are any of the bathrooms accessible for someone with mobility challenges? How often are you, your spouse, or your kids really at home? Will your parent still be alone a lot?

If your goal is a long-term solution, you might need to make modifications to your house. While the number of home remodelers specializing in home modifications for seniors continues to climb, it all comes at a cost. The expenses associated with adding ramps and step-free showers, widening doorways, and installing better lighting can quickly add up.

  1. How does everyone else feel about this idea?

There’s no way around it: combining two households is a big adjustment. Is it realistic to think everyone can adjust to this change without causing permanent rifts within the family?

While this solution might be beneficial for you if you are the primary caregiver, others in your family might not be as excited. It’s important to consider your parent’s, spouse’s, and children’s feelings.

  1. Are you willing to sacrifice some of your privacy?

Unless your house has a separate in-law suite or lots of unused space, you’ll have to get used to a lot of togetherness. The loss of privacy can be difficult on your parent and your children—but also on your marriage. Are you and your spouse prepared for that?

  1. Have you considered all of your options?

Having a parent move in for a few weeks or months while they are recuperating from an illness or surgery is often an ideal solution. But having them stay permanently might not be the best way to go. They might prefer the support of an in-home caregiver or a move to an independent or assisted living community where they can have their own apartment or suite.

Before you make a decision, be sure you and your parent have considered all of your options.

Explore Legacy Senior Living

With independent and assisted living communities throughout the southeast, Legacy Senior Living has a proven track record for helping seniors and their families find a care solution that best meets their needs. Call us today for help determining what type of care your parent might benefit from.