What Questions Should You Ask During an Assisted Living Community Tour?

April 8, 2019

right questions

Asking the right questions is an important part of choosing an assisted living community. These tips will help you know what to ask.

When families begin to explore assisted living communities for a senior loved one, knowing the right questions to ask is important. While a beautiful lobby and plush grounds are nice features, making an informed decision requires learning more about the community’s quality of care and how it operates.

Here are nine questions you’ll want to ask each assisted living community you are considering.

9 Questions to Ask When Touring an Assisted Living Community

  1. How does the community recruit, screen, and train its caregivers?

Quality care is dependent upon having experienced, compassionate caregivers. Ask questions that help you determine how team members are recruited and screened.

It’s also important to learn more about the community’s training program. After the initial orientation and training period, what else is done to help team members continue to learn and grow as professionals?

  1. Pay attention to relationships

This tip is more of an observation than a question, but it’s an important factor in making a solid decision. As you are touring an assisted living community, pay close attention to the relationships and interactions between staff and residents. Do residents seem happy and engaged? Do staff members know residents and family members’ names? Facial expressions and body language can tell a story so it’s essential to pay attention.

  1. What is the community’s staff turnover rate?

Caring for older adults isn’t easy, physically or emotionally. That’s why the staff turnover rate is higher in assisted living and memory care communities than in independent living properties. A staff turnover rate that is too high, however, may be a sign that an assisted living community isn’t well-managed.

Remember, when staff turnover is low, residents, caregivers, and families have an opportunity to get to know and trust one another. This promotes stronger continuity of care.

  1. How many caregivers are there for residents?

The caregiver-to-resident ratio is an important factor in providing quality care. When an assisted living community is well staffed, caregivers have ample time to spend with each resident. Staff members are also able to detect small changes in health and intervene early when they aren’t rushed.

  1. What happens if a resident needs more care?

Sometimes a senior’s needs change after they move to an assisted living community. Make certain you ask what will happen if your loved one needs more assistance. Can they get more help at the community or will they need to move again? Moving can be difficult at any age, but especially so for an older adult with declining health.

  1. What does the monthly fee include?

Every assisted living community prices their services differently. This can make it difficult for families to compare the cost of one assisted living community with another. Ask for a detailed list of what is included in the monthly fee. Just as important, ask what additional expenses you should expect each month.

  1. How often do monthly fees increase?

Expenses associated with operating an assisted living community increase each year. Caregivers earn raises, the cost of groceries goes up, as do supplies, insurance expenses, and utilities. Make sure you understand how much rates typically increase and how often. Also, ask how much notice your family will be given before rates go up.

  1. Where can you see a copy of the community’s state survey results?

Every state regulates assisted living communities differently, but they all conduct surveys to ensure that rules are being followed. Ask the sales person or the executive director where you can review the community’s state survey results. Some states publish them online to make it easier for consumers to gain access.

  1. What documents will you be required to sign?

Before you leave the community, ask for copies of the documents you would be required to sign should your loved one decide to live there. Then take time to review them and make a list of follow-up questions. You’ll want to make sure you know how deposits are handled, how much notice you will need to give if your family member wants to move again, and other financial details. Some families find it helpful to have an attorney review the documents and point out any potential concerns.

Talking to a Senior about Moving

If you’ve been putting off having a conversation with your senior loved one about moving, know that you aren’t alone. Many adult children view this topic as a tough one to handle.

We created “6 Tips for Talking about Assisted Living with a Senior” to help families like yours. You’ll find suggestions for everything from what words to use to how to handle resistance. You can also call Legacy Senior Living at 423-478-8071 with any questions about assisted living!

How to Get a Senior’s Home Ready for a Quick, Profitable Sale

March 11, 2019

quick, profitable sale

Are you getting ready to sell yours or a senior loved one’s home? Here are six tips for a quick, profitable sale.

Preparing to sell your home or the home of a senior loved one can be intimidating. Since most older adults who are moving to a senior living community need the proceeds from a home sale to help finance their transition, getting a quick, profitable sale is important.

If your family is getting ready to sell, these 6 tips can help you make a quick, profitable sale.

6 Tips to Get the Best Price on the Sale of a Senior’s Home

  1. Downsize and declutter: If a senior has lived in their home for a long time, they’ve likely acquired a lot of belongings. When rooms look cluttered, it can make the house appear smaller. Take time to go room-by-room to downsize and declutter. Pack up items that are no longer needed or donate them to a charity.
  2. Clean and freshen up: First impressions are important when it comes to selling a house. That’s true for both the interior and exterior. Trim the shrubs, give the front door a new coat of paint if it looks drab, plant a few pots of colorful flowers, and freshen up the mulch. Clean the carpets and flooring, scrub the bathrooms, and make sure the kitchen is sparkling.
  3. Make minor repairs: Replacing broken lights, fixing leaky faucets, and taking care of other minor repairs is important too. It sends a signal that the house has been well-cared-for. This can give potential buyers peace of mind.
  4. Set the right price: Many sellers have a sentimental attachment to their home. It can result in setting a price that is too high for market conditions. When a home is overpriced, it discourages potential buyers from looking or making an offer. This can not only slow down the selling process, but also result in the home going for a lower price when it does sell. Setting a realistic price sometimes triggers a bidding war among buyers that may help sell the home for more than list price.
  5. Pack up personal items: A seller’s personal touches make the house a home, but these can also make it more difficult for potential buyers to picture themselves living there. Before listing the house, remove personal items from the home, such as family photos and other mementos.
  6. Be flexible about showings: Be willing to let the home be shown on short notice, or during early mornings or dinnertime. While it might not be convenient, it can allow potential buyers who work to see the home. Whenever possible, the senior should leave the home when a realtor is showing the house. This makes it less awkward for everyone involved.

Preparing for a New Chapter in Life

Moving is tough at any age, but planning for the transition can help reduce stress and anxiety. If you or an older loved one are considering a move to a senior community in the southeast, we hope you will keep Legacy Senior Living in mind.

With communities in six states, we likely have an option near you. Call us today at (423) 478-8071 to learn more!

Family Feuds and Caregiving: How to Manage the Disagreements

February 11, 2019

Family feuds often occur when a senior loved one’s health is declining. Use these tips to navigate difficult family dynamics.

When a senior loved one’s health begins to decline, it can create uncomfortable family dynamics. This is especially true when it comes to adult children. One child may want to take a proactive approach to planning for a parent’s future care, while another may be in denial about the situation. The struggle can bring unresolved family feuds to the surface again.

Many families find themselves bickering over finances and how to provide care for a parent. Adult children often disagree about who will manage specific tasks, and where a parent will live as they grow older. A sibling who lives closest to the parent might feel that their out-of-town siblings aren’t helping like they should.

Finding productive ways to manage these difficult conflicts and doing what is best for the aging parent is vital.

5 Ways Siblings Can Manage Disagreements over a Senior’s Care

  1. Put a parent’s wishes first: If your senior loved one is able to express their wishes, ask them what they want. Don’t make assumptions without seeking their input whenever possible.
  2. Be respectful but firm: If your bossy older brother isn’t pulling his weight when it comes to caring for your parent, it may be tempting to let your temper get the best of you. While you might feel better in the short term, it won’t help over the long run. Make a list of your parent’s needs and ask him which specific tasks he will help with and when. If he won’t pitch in or doesn’t follow through, ask him to hire an outside caregiver to give the siblings who are providing care a break.
  3. Keep communicating: Try to promote communication between siblings. Update one another about changes in your parent and their care needs. If one sibling is acting as the primary caregiver, another one should assume responsibility for keeping everyone informed. This might be via Skype or FaceTime or by using a caregiver app.
  4. Utilize respite care: Stress and sleep deprivation caused by caregiving can make family feuds peak. One way to prevent that is to take advantage of respite care programs at local senior living communities. Your parent can stay for a few days or a few weeks to give adult children and spouses time to restore their well-being.
  5. Seek unbiased mediation: It’s an unfortunate reality that some families might not be able to agree on how to provide for a senior loved one. For those families, an elder care mediator might be a good solution. These professionals are knowledgeable about local support options and can aid families in creating a plan for a senior’s future. You can search the National Care Planning Council’s website to find an elder care mediator near you.

Learn More about Senior Living

If you aren’t quite sure what type of care a senior loved one might need, we’d be happy to help. From assisted living to memory care, the teams at Legacy Senior Living communities will be happy to answer your questions. Call the community nearest you today!

What to Consider Before Becoming a Power of Attorney (POA) for a Loved One

January 14, 2019

Read this important information before agreeing to become a power of attorney (POA) for a friend or family member.

An important legal document for older adults to have is a power of attorney, often referred to as a POA. It allows you to designate someone to act on your behalf if you are unable to make decisions for yourself.

There are four basic POA categories:

  • General Power of Attorney: Awards a designee wide-ranging power, such as the authority to pay bills or hire and pay an in-home caregiver.
  • Special Power of Attorney: Can be granted for a specific, one-time purpose. For example, to sign home purchase paperwork, if you will be out-of-state, or to sell a car if you can’t be there to handle the sale.
  • Health Care Power of Attorney: Gives a person you designate authority to make health-related decisions on your behalf if you are unable to do so.
  • Durable Power of Attorney: A provision that ensures your wishes are maintained and the authority of your POA is honored in the event you become mentally incapacitated.

If a senior in your life asks you to act as a POA, it might be tempting to agree without considering what the role really entails. But there are important details to think through before you accept a request to become a POA for a friend or family member.

Are You the Best Person to be a POA?

Here are a few factors to understand about POA responsibilities:

  • Do you live close enough to quickly get to the senior’s home in the event of an emergency?
  • Are you comfortable making tough decisions? This is especially important for those who will be a health care POA.
  • Do you feel at ease managing or overseeing financial affairs? A POA will often need to assist with bill paying, asset liquidation, and overall financial support.
  • While this one may be tough to consider, family dynamics can make accepting a POA role too difficult. When families can’t agree, hiring an attorney or other professional to fulfill the POA role might be better.
  • If you know your loved one’s wishes aren’t shared by other family members, will you be strong enough to stand up to peer pressure? A POA’s job is to make sure the senior’s directives are followed.
  • Is your health good enough to take on these responsibilities? Many POAs aren’t required to act very often. But in the event of a crisis, the role can become very demanding so it is important to consider your health before accepting.

Financing Senior Living

One task a POA might be called to assist with is selecting a senior living community and creating a budget to finance it. “Financing Your Retirement” is a resource we created to help you learn more.

We cover options from the Aid & Attendance program for veterans to exploring life care funding. If you have additional questions, please call us at (423) 478-8071. We’ll be happy to help you find the answers you need!

Tour Assisted Living during the Holidays

December 10, 2018

 

Tax deductions for Senior Care

The holiday season can be a great time to tour assisted living communities with a senior loved one. Here’s what families should know and consider.

If you and a senior loved one have been discussing a move to an assisted living community in the new year, the holidays can be an ideal time to start touring. While some families might be reluctant to broach this subject during the holiday season, there are reasons why they should.

Assisted living communities, like those at Legacy Senior Living, give older adults the support they need to live their best quality of life. An excellent way to learn more about these communities is by visiting in person.

5 Reasons to Visit Assisted Living Communities during the Holidays

Here are a few of the many reasons you and your aging loved one should make time to visit assisted living communities this holiday season:

  1. The halls are decked: Most assisted living communities go all out decorating for the holidays. Residents and their families usually participate in the fun which brings a festive atmosphere to the community.
  2. Seasonal activities abound: While assisted living communities are known for offering life-enrichment activities and wellness programs all year, the holidays are especially inviting. Local youth groups and community organizations often join forces with the staff to host choir programs, music concerts, open houses, game nights, and more. Potential residents can join the fun and get an inside look at what it’s like to live there.
  3. Visiting family can participate: Long-distance family members are often in town during the holiday season. Touring assisted living communities with extended family can give everyone a chance to ask questions and learn more about the options.
  4. Talk with resident families: Family members of residents often visit in greater numbers during the holiday season. This gives you an opportunity to ask them questions about their satisfaction with the community’s care and services. Their insight can be invaluable as you and your loved one try to make an informed decision.
  5. Beat the January rush: January is one of the busiest months of the year for assisted living communities. Families who have put off making this decision often feel a sense of urgency after spending time with a senior loved one during the holidays. Visiting in December allows staff members to spend more time giving tours and answering questions. It will also give your family member first pick of the apartments or suites that are available.

Before visiting your first community, take time to create a list of questions to ask during your tour. Making an informed choice depends on asking the right questions and being satisfied with the answers you receive. “5 Questions to Ask on a Senior Living Community Tour” can help you get your list started!

4 Ways to Manage Caregiver Stress during the Holidays

November 19, 2018

Manage Caregiver Stress during the Holidays

The holidays can be especially overwhelming for caregivers. Use these 4 tips to manage caregiver stress during the holidays and enjoy time with loved ones.

The holiday season can be a busy time of year. Shopping, decorating, wrapping gifts, cooking, and hosting parties are traditions for many families. For already overscheduled caregivers, the added demands of the holidays can be especially overwhelming.

Four in ten caregivers say the holidays are too much. They can’t juggle all of the demands their schedule and the season create. But there are ways you can set more realistic expectations and enjoy the holidays this year.

In honor of National Family Caregivers Month, we are sharing a few tips to help manage stress and avoid caregiver burnout.

4 Ways to Prevent Caregiver Burnout during the Holidays

  1. Accept help: Caregivers are often reluctant to ask for or accept help. Give yourself permission to do so this holiday season. Maybe a friend can pick up some of your holiday gifts while they are doing their own shopping. You could ask a family member to stay with your loved one so you can attend a party. If neither of those is an option, respite care might be. Your family member can enjoy a few days at an assisted living community to give you the time to get things done. Then you can relax and enjoy a few holiday festivities.
  2. Think creatively: Instead of trying to do it all alone, think about ways you can accomplish your goals more easily. While you might want to bake holiday cookies, buying them at a local bakery is quicker and easier. Using festive gift bags in lieu of gift wrap is another time saver. You might be accustomed to shopping for gifts online, but you can also shop online for home-delivered meals, wine, and other holiday essentials.
  3. Create new traditions: Setting more realistic expectations is another way to manage caregiver stress during the holidays. That often means adopting new holiday traditions, at least while you are a caregiver. Change a formal sit-down dinner to a potluck. Keep holiday decorations to a minimum. Send a festive holiday email in lieu of a card. This will give you time to truly enjoy the season with the people you love.
  4. Connect with peers: Another way to help manage caregiver stress is by connecting with fellow caregivers. You may find new ideas for navigating the holidays. Many family caregivers find online support groups to be the most convenient way to connect. The National Center on Caregiving’s Family Caregiver Alliance has some you might want to consider. If you are caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or a similar form of dementia, a good online support group is

Resources for Family Caregivers

If you are a caregiver looking for more news and research on caring for a senior loved one, we invite you to bookmark the Legacy Senior Living blog and stop back often. We update our blog every week so you have access to the most current information on aging, caregiving, senior living, and dementia.

Fire Prevention and the Fire Risks Older Adults Face

October 15, 2018

October is Fire Prevention Month.

October is Fire Prevention Month. Use these prevention measures to help a senior loved one lower their risk of being harmed in a fire.

October is Fire Prevention Month. If you are a caregiver for a family elder or senior friend, you might be surprised to learn how frightening the statistics surrounding fires and older adults are. Older adults are at two times greater risk for being seriously injured or losing their life in a fire. While seniors account for only 13% of the country’s population, 35% of fire-related deaths are seniors.

To help raise awareness during Fire Prevention Month, the team at Legacy Senior Living is sharing steps you can take to protect an older loved one from being harmed in a fire.

5 Fire Safety Measures to Protect Older Adults

  1. Space heater hazards: Older adults who have poor circulation or take blood thinner medications may feel cold when others don’t. It can prompt them to use small electric space heaters in their bedroom, bathroom, and living room. While space heaters can help warm the air surrounding the senior, they should be used with caution. Read and follow the instructions to prevent fires. One of the warnings you’ll likely find is to make sure the space heater has at least a three-foot clearance on all sides to avoid a fire.
  2. Kitchen fire concerns: A fire prevention expert will no doubt tell you that most home fires begin in the kitchen, with cooking being the leading cause. You can help your senior loved one avoid a kitchen fire by helping them establish a method of reminding them they have something cooking if they leave the room. It might be as simple as taking a spatula with them. A device like CookStop turns the burner off if movement in the kitchen isn’t detected for a predetermined amount of time. Kitchen clothing and towels can also present a hazard. Seniors should also avoid loose-fitting sleeves that can brush up against a burner and ignite.
  3. Extension cord risks: Seniors often live in the same home for decades. Older homes frequently have fewer electrical outlets than newer homes, leading to greater use of extension cords to connect all of today’s modern devices. While it may be convenient, it might overload a circuit and cause a fire. It can also present a fall risk for a senior who may trip over the cords.
  4. Smoke detector function: Make certain the older adults in your life have working smoke detectors in their homes. Fire experts say at least one smoke detector should be installed on every floor of the home. Have detectors for fire and for smoke. Check the batteries often to make sure they are working. If your loved one has hearing loss, some models of smoke detectors use a strobe light to flash an alert.
  5. Escape planning: Seniors often have slower reflexes and mobility issues that can slow down their escape in the event of a fire. That’s why it’s important to create an escape plan just in case. Help your senior loved one practice several routes for escaping from different rooms in their home in case a fire breaks out.

If you would like to learn more about fire prevention and senior safety, this free publication, Fire Safety Checklist, was developed by FEMA and the U.S. Fire Administration.

Emergency Preparedness at Legacy Communities

At Legacy Senior Living communities throughout the southeast, we take emergency preparedness very seriously. From fire prevention to storm safety awareness, we plan for the unexpected. We invite you to tour the community nearest you and ask our team to share their emergency preparedness plans with you. It will give you peace of mind knowing your loved one is in good hands if they move to a Legacy community.

Journaling to Help Manage Caregiver Stress

September 12, 2018

Journaling can help manage stress

Caregivers often live with high levels of stress and anxiety. Finding ways to manage it is key to a caregiver’s personal health. Learn how journaling can help.

Acting as a caregiver for a loved one can be very rewarding. It provides family members with an opportunity to care for an aging parent, grandparent, or other elder who once cared for them. The intimate nature of caregiving gives families a chance to connect in meaningful ways.

It’s important to know, however, that caregiving isn’t an easy role to assume. If you are stressed and overwhelmed, know that you aren’t alone in those feelings.

Being responsible for the health and well-being of someone around the clock can be physically, mentally, and emotionally exhausting. It isn’t uncommon for a caregiver to experience a health crisis of their own. One way to prevent that is to practice good self-care. Doing so will allow you to manage the stress and strain that can put a family caregiver’s health at risk.

Journaling is one potential solution to explore.

Narrative Therapy to Manage Caregiver Stress

Researchers say journaling is a therapeutic exercise, so much so that they refer to it as narrative therapy. Getting feelings down on paper often helps caregivers come to terms with their doubts and fears and move to a place of resolution and peace.

At the University of Iowa’s School of Nursing, researchers looked at journaling as an activity to help lower the stress and anxiety common among family caregivers. In a trial of 800 participants, researchers found that caregivers who documented their daily highs and lows along with their fears and worries had lower rates of stress and lived healthier lives.

Journaling provides an opportunity for the conscious and subconscious minds to work through their challenges, which results in lower stress. Reducing chronic stress strengthens the immune system, keeping the caregiver healthy.

The Caregiver Journal

While journaling is a great way to relieve stress, figuring out how to get started can be intimidating. Journaling experts say not to overthink it. Head to your local discount store and purchase an inexpensive notebook or two. Skip the fancy journals for now.

Schedule ten or fifteen minutes each night before you go to sleep to document how you feel about the day. Getting your worries down on paper might help you sleep better. If you are struggling to figure out how you really feel, ask yourself a few questions and log the answers in your journal.

Use these prompts to get started:

  • What did I have difficulty coping with today?
  • What went well today?
  • What memories did I make today that I can look back on when I’m no longer a caregiver?
  • What challenges do I need to find a solution for?
  • What is worrying me or making me feel stressed?
  • What do I need to accept and find peace with?
  • What am I grateful for today?

After a few weeks, you’ll likely find journaling becomes easier and you won’t have to rely on prompts each day.

Respite Services Give Caregivers a Break

One more tip for managing caregiver stress is to accept that no one can do it alone. Every caregiver needs to take regular breaks to rest and restore. Legacy communities offer short-term respite care services for that very reason. A senior can be our guest for a few days or weeks while their caregiver takes some time off. Call the Legacy Senior Living community nearest you to learn more!

What to Consider Before Moving Your Aging Parent in With You

August 27, 2018

6 tips for talking about assisted living

Thinking of moving your aging parent in to your home? Here are a few factors to consider before you make a move.

More adult children are finding themselves stepping in to the role of caregiver for an aging parent. For many busy families, it often becomes a challenge to manage a loved one’s care while also maintaining your own separate household. It often leads adult children to explore the feasibility of moving a parent in with them. While it might be a great solution for some families, it isn’t for everyone.

How can you decide if moving your aging parent in with you is a viable option?

We have a few suggestions on what you should consider before you make this move.

4 Factors to Consider Before Moving Your Aging Parent in to Your Home

  1. Is your home any safer than your parent’s home?

An adult child might think that because their home is newer and more people will be around that their parent is safer living with them. But are they really?

Take an honest look at your own home’s physical environment and your family’s lifestyle.

Does your home have a lot of stairs? Are any of the bathrooms accessible for someone with mobility challenges? How often are you, your spouse, or your kids really at home? Will your parent still be alone a lot?

If your goal is a long-term solution, you might need to make modifications to your house. While the number of home remodelers specializing in home modifications for seniors continues to climb, it all comes at a cost. The expenses associated with adding ramps and step-free showers, widening doorways, and installing better lighting can quickly add up.

  1. How does everyone else feel about this idea?

There’s no way around it: combining two households is a big adjustment. Is it realistic to think everyone can adjust to this change without causing permanent rifts within the family?

While this solution might be beneficial for you if you are the primary caregiver, others in your family might not be as excited. It’s important to consider your parent’s, spouse’s, and children’s feelings.

  1. Are you willing to sacrifice some of your privacy?

Unless your house has a separate in-law suite or lots of unused space, you’ll have to get used to a lot of togetherness. The loss of privacy can be difficult on your parent and your children—but also on your marriage. Are you and your spouse prepared for that?

  1. Have you considered all of your options?

Having a parent move in for a few weeks or months while they are recuperating from an illness or surgery is often an ideal solution. But having them stay permanently might not be the best way to go. They might prefer the support of an in-home caregiver or a move to an independent or assisted living community where they can have their own apartment or suite.

Before you make a decision, be sure you and your parent have considered all of your options.

Explore Legacy Senior Living

With independent and assisted living communities throughout the southeast, Legacy Senior Living has a proven track record for helping seniors and their families find a care solution that best meets their needs. Call us today for help determining what type of care your parent might benefit from.

How to Protect Your Marriage When You are a Caregiver

August 13, 2018

Sandwich generation

Caregiving can take a toll on a married couple in the Sandwich generation. These tips can help you protect your marriage while you are busy caring for a senior loved one.

Family caregivers say that one of the greatest challenges they face while caring for a parent or other senior loved one is protecting their own marriage. “Sandwich generation” caregivers juggle many different roles—daughter, mother, wife, employee, and more—so it can be a tough balancing act.

The stress, fear, and frustration that caregivers encounter can take a real toll on a marriage. A non-caregiving partner may understand their spouse is struggling, but that doesn’t prevent them from feeling as if their needs are important. A spouse might also be on the receiving end of misplaced anger and frustration simply because a caregiver doesn’t know how to cope with the rollercoaster of emotions they are experiencing.

Finding a healthy balance is vital for a caregiver to protect their marriage.

5 Tips to Help Caregivers Maintain a Healthy Marriage

Here are a few tips you might find helpful:

  1. Connect with a support group: One of the first steps you can take is to connect with a support group. Some caregivers find an online support group works best for their schedule. Connecting with peers can help you find a healthy outlet for sharing your caregiving struggles. That takes your spouse off the hot seat and allows the two of you to talk about matters other than the ups and downs of caregiving.
  2. Communicate: While caregiving likely requires you to be away from home a lot, make sure your spouse knows you are thinking of them. Leave notes for them to find around the house, send text messages, and take advantage of video chat programs and platforms to stay in touch.
  3. Express appreciation: Even if your spouse doesn’t complain about your caregiving duties, they might still resent them or feel neglected. It’s important to tell them how much you appreciate their support. Don’t take for granted that they know you are grateful. Tell them.
  4. Take time out: Caregiving is emotionally and physically exhausting. Health experts recommend family caregivers take regular breaks and schedule nights out with their spouse. If you don’t have a sibling or other trusted friend who can care for your loved one while you take time off, consider using respite services. Assisted living communities—including the Legacy Senior Living communities—offer this short-term care option to provide family caregivers with an opportunity to recharge.
  5. Set realistic expectations: Family caregivers often worry about how good of a job they are doing caring for their loved one. It can lead them to overcompensate and do too much. Ask yourself if the tasks that are consuming your time are really necessary. Are there places where you can cut back? Or can you use technology, like FaceTime or Skype, to check in virtually? Try to set realistic expectations for yourself.

If a senior loved one’s care is getting to be too much to manage at home, Legacy Senior Living can help. Our award-winning communities are located throughout the south. Call the community nearest you today to schedule a time for a private tour!