How to Protect Your Marriage When You are a Caregiver

August 13, 2018

Sandwich generation

Caregiving can take a toll on a married couple in the Sandwich generation. These tips can help you protect your marriage while you are busy caring for a senior loved one.

Family caregivers say that one of the greatest challenges they face while caring for a parent or other senior loved one is protecting their own marriage. “Sandwich generation” caregivers juggle many different roles—daughter, mother, wife, employee, and more—so it can be a tough balancing act.

The stress, fear, and frustration that caregivers encounter can take a real toll on a marriage. A non-caregiving partner may understand their spouse is struggling, but that doesn’t prevent them from feeling as if their needs are important. A spouse might also be on the receiving end of misplaced anger and frustration simply because a caregiver doesn’t know how to cope with the rollercoaster of emotions they are experiencing.

Finding a healthy balance is vital for a caregiver to protect their marriage.

5 Tips to Help Caregivers Maintain a Healthy Marriage

Here are a few tips you might find helpful:

  1. Connect with a support group: One of the first steps you can take is to connect with a support group. Some caregivers find an online support group works best for their schedule. Connecting with peers can help you find a healthy outlet for sharing your caregiving struggles. That takes your spouse off the hot seat and allows the two of you to talk about matters other than the ups and downs of caregiving.
  2. Communicate: While caregiving likely requires you to be away from home a lot, make sure your spouse knows you are thinking of them. Leave notes for them to find around the house, send text messages, and take advantage of video chat programs and platforms to stay in touch.
  3. Express appreciation: Even if your spouse doesn’t complain about your caregiving duties, they might still resent them or feel neglected. It’s important to tell them how much you appreciate their support. Don’t take for granted that they know you are grateful. Tell them.
  4. Take time out: Caregiving is emotionally and physically exhausting. Health experts recommend family caregivers take regular breaks and schedule nights out with their spouse. If you don’t have a sibling or other trusted friend who can care for your loved one while you take time off, consider using respite services. Assisted living communities—including the Legacy Senior Living communities—offer this short-term care option to provide family caregivers with an opportunity to recharge.
  5. Set realistic expectations: Family caregivers often worry about how good of a job they are doing caring for their loved one. It can lead them to overcompensate and do too much. Ask yourself if the tasks that are consuming your time are really necessary. Are there places where you can cut back? Or can you use technology, like FaceTime or Skype, to check in virtually? Try to set realistic expectations for yourself.

If a senior loved one’s care is getting to be too much to manage at home, Legacy Senior Living can help. Our award-winning communities are located throughout the south. Call the community nearest you today to schedule a time for a private tour!

6 Tips for Talking about Assisted Living with a Senior

July 9, 2018

6 tips for talking about assisted living

If you’ve been putting it off or if the conversation is one you will soon need to have, here are 6 tips for talking about Assisted Living from Legacy Senior Living.

Talking with a parent about moving to assisted living isn’t always easy. In fact, adult children who call our Legacy Senior Living communities often say that the very idea of initiating this conversation with an aging parent makes them uncomfortable. Some put it off until a medical emergency or other crisis occurs. The senior’s family is then forced to make a quick decision in the midst of an already-stressful time.

To help ensure your parent has time to make an informed choice, it’s best to plan ahead.

Tips for Talking about Assisted Living

To help lay the groundwork for an eventual move, it may help to begin to slowly introduce the many benefits of assisted living communities. From support with daily routines to housekeeping and maintenance, an assisted living community frees seniors from the burdens of home ownership.

An assisted living community also offers a wide variety of life enrichment, wellness, and social activities. This connection helps seniors live a more active and vibrant life at every age.

Some additional tips for talking about assisted living with your senior loved one include:

  • Introducing the topic in indirect ways: Think about how you can broach the subject of assisted living in more indirect ways. Has your senior loved one recently had a friend move to a senior living community? Ask how they are doing and mention that you’d like to visit them. Is there an event coming up at an assisted living community near you? Suggest you both attend together. Ensuring your family member sees an assisted living community in person can help overcome any myths and stigmas they may have about senior living communities.
  • Being mindful of your language: Avoid using phrases that can appear to be too bossy or forceful, such as “you need to,” or “you have to.” Instead, adopt a softer approach. Ask open-ended questions to gauge how your loved one is feeling and what their concerns and fears about this type of change might be. It will help them to feel more in control of the process and their future, and will allow you to better understand their point of view.
  • Sharing your fears and hopes: Share the worries you have about your loved one’s health and safety in a kind, respectful way. It might be a concern they will fall and not be able to call for help, or that their home will be targeted by criminals who recognize a senior lives there alone. Also share how you think assisted living will benefit them, such as a safe environment and the wide variety of life enrichment activities that are available. Let them know your hope is for them to live their highest quality of life and that you believe an assisted living community is the best way to do that.

What to Do If You Encounter Resistance

Be prepared to encounter resistance, at least early on. Remember, just because you are ready for your loved one to make this move doesn’t mean they are. Tread lightly so you don’t put your senior loved one on the defensive. Even though their health may be declining, they still need to feel they are in control of their own life.

Here are a few more tips for talking about assisted living in the face of resistance:

  • Respect their feelings: If your loved one is resisting, it might be necessary to drop the subject for a while. Continuing to push them may cause them to dig in and refuse to move. Unless you are fearful for their safety, put the topic on the back burner for a few weeks.
  • Bring in backup: Is there someone in your family or one of your loved one’s medical professionals who they respect and look up to? Enlisting their help in this discussion might be another option. It might be their primary care physician who knows their health is declining or a pastor who understands the benefits offered by assisted living communities. Think about who has influence and would be willing to assist.
  • Encourage a tour: Ask your senior loved one to consider taking a tour of at least one or two assisted living communities. Agree they are under no obligation to move, but are touring just to learn more about all of the benefits. It might help if you visit communities ahead of time to screen out those that aren’t likely to be a good fit. Then choose two you think might best meet your loved one’s needs and bring them for a visit.

Legacy Senior Living communities welcome visitors for tours and lunch every day! One of our experienced team members will be happy to answer all of your questions about assisted living and show you firsthand how passionate we are about delivering quality care, exceptional service, professional support, and compassionate friendship to our residents and their family members. Call us today to set up a private visit.

5 Summer Safety Tips for Seniors

June 12, 2018

5 Summer Safety Tips for Seniors

Summer heat can present health risks for older adults. Follow these 5 summer safety tips to keep an older adult in your family safe.

As we prepare to welcome the first day of summer on June 21st, we want to take time to share a few safety tips. While most of us enjoy spending time outdoors during the summer months, it’s important to remember that the heat and humidity commonly found in the south can be especially dangerous for older adults.

Here are a few tips caregivers can use to keep seniors in the family safe.

5 Ways to Help a Senior Loved One Stay Safe This Summer

  1. Know the risks of heat and humidity
    Each year extreme heat causes an estimated 658 deaths. Older adults are at higher risk for heat-related illnesses because our bodies lose some of their ability to process extreme temperatures as we age. Certain medications and health conditions—such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma—may also worsen during the heat of the summer.Talk with your senior loved one’s physician for advice about managing a chronic health condition during the summer months. Also be sure to review the older adult’s medication list to see if any are impacted by heat or humidity.
  2. Take sun safety precautions
    This generation of older adults didn’t grow up wearing sunscreen. As a result, they don’t always follow good sun safety practices. Encourage your senior loved one to apply a sunscreen with an SPF of 30 any time they are outdoors or riding in a car. This helps to reduce their risk of developing skin cancer. Wearing a long-sleeve shirt and long pants in a lightweight, breathable fabric can also help block the sun, as can a hat and sunglasses.
  3. Stay out of the mid-day sun
    The sun is strongest between the hours of 10 AM and 2 PM. Remind the older adults in your life to plan errands, appointments, and outdoor activities around these peak sun times.Also make sure your senior loved one has a safe, cool place to get out of the summer heat. If their home isn’t air conditioned, create a list of local malls, senior centers, coffee shops, bookstores, and movie theaters they can visit that are.
  4. Encourage hydration
    Drinking water is another step necessary to stay safe during the summer heat. Most health professionals recommend drinking eight glasses a day, more if an adult is sweating or swimming.Encourage your senior loved one to keep a supply of cold water in their refrigerator and a bottle of it by their side all day.
  1. Watch for symptoms of a heat-related illness
    Make sure you and other loved ones know the early warning signs of a heat-related illness A few of the most common ones include confusion, pale skin, nausea, vomiting, dark urine, dizziness, fatigue, headache, rapid pulse, and diarrhea. Seek medical help immediately if you or a senior in your life exhibit these symptoms.

Follow the Legacy Senior Living Blog

To continue learning more about healthy aging, caregiving, and other aging-related issues, we encourage you to bookmark The Legacy Senior Living Blog and stop back often.

The Important Role Nurses Play in Aging Well

May 7, 2018

In honor of Nurse Appreciation Week, Legacy Senior Living is sharing insight on the vital role nurses play in residents’ lives each day.

Nurses are often the unsung heroes of our health care system. You will find them delivering care in settings ranging from a physician’s office to hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living communities, or even private homes. In addition to caring for the patient, they often help provide support to the family.

At the Legacy communities throughout the south, we count on nurses for a variety of critically important responsibilities. In honor of national Nurse Appreciation Week celebrated from May 6th through 12th this year, we want to highlight the contributions nurses make to our residents’ lives every day.

Nurses: Inspire, Innovate, Influence

Creating resident care plans

Nurses often take the lead in collaborating with other team members to create care plans for residents in assisted living and memory care communities. These care plans are designed to meet each resident’s unique needs and interests. As a resident’s needs change, the plan of care is adapted and changed, too.

Sometimes the change is only temporary, like when a resident has undergone hip surgery and needs additional support for a few weeks while they recover. Other times the need for more care is permanent. It might be that a resident has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease.

The nursing staff typically plays a key role in helping assess these types of changes and making sure the resident receives the type and amount of care they need.

Medication management

Almost all of the residents of an assisted living or memory care community need a helping hand to stay on track with their medication. It’s no surprise why when you learn how many different types of medicine seniors often juggle.

Research shows older adults take an average of five or more different types of medication each day. For those who live in a long-term care setting, that number rises to seven. Remembering to take the right dose of each medication at the right time, in addition to filling and refilling each prescription, can be overwhelming for a senior.

In a senior living community, nurses are the ones who manage the medication process for residents. They oversee medication administration, look for potential adverse reactions in residents, and make sure prescriptions are refilled in a timely fashion.

Chronic disease monitoring

Another important role nurses play in senior living communities is monitoring resident wellness. This is especially important for older adults who live with chronic health conditions like diabetes or high blood pressure.

Nurses in assisted living and memory care communities get to know each resident. It helps them identify small changes that might indicate a problem. They can work with the resident’s physician to intervene early before a small issue becomes a life-threatening one.

Thanking Our Nurses

This week and every week, we salute and thank the nurses who make it possible for our residents to live their best quality of life every day. Stop by the Legacy Senior Living community nearest you to learn more about our commitment to building strong bonds between residents, staff, and families.

How to Thank a Family Caregiver on Mother’s Day

April 23, 2018

Looking for ways to thank a family caregiver on Mother’s Day? We have a few ideas you might find helpful.

Looking for ways to thank a family caregiver on Mother’s Day? We have a few ideas you might find helpful.

If someone in your life is a caregiver for a senior they love, you probably know how challenging their days can be. While it’s a role family members willingly embrace, being responsible for the care of an older adult can be stressful and exhausting. In many families, one sibling often shoulders most of the caregiving duties. They act as the primary caregiver and contact person for the senior.

Mother’s Day can be a great time to thank a family caregiver and show them how much you appreciate their dedication.

6 Ways to Thank a Family Caregiver

1. Day of indulgence: One idea to care for someone who puts everyone else first is by giving them an afternoon at a local spa. Give them a choice of pampering services such as a massage, a manicure and pedicure, a facial, or another spa specialty.

2. Hire a housekeeper: Family caregivers often put their own needs on the back burner while caring for a loved one. One way you can help is by hiring a cleaning service. Enlisting a professional housekeeper for a day can help lighten the caregiver’s load and lift their spirits. Instead of worrying about how they’ll get spring cleaning done at their own house, they’ll be able to come home to a freshly cleaned home.

3. Gift of time: Something most caregivers never have enough of is time. You can change that by helping to arrange and finance a respite care stay at a local senior living community. These short-term stays allow the senior to enjoy the same benefits as a long-term resident, including nutritious meals and a full calendar of activities. It can be a mini-vacation for the older adult while the caregiver enjoys some free time of their own.

4. Nutritious meals: Caregivers often survive on convenience foods and fast food eaten on the run. An unhealthy diet can lead to a health crisis of their own. A meaningful Mother’s Day gift for a caregiver could be to stock their freezer with nutritious and tasty home-cooked meals or gift cards to a local restaurant that offers healthy takeout meals.

5. Caregiver package: Another way to thank a family caregiver might be to put together a personalized caregiver package. Items to include might be a nice journal and pen. Journaling is a great stress-reliever for caregivers. You can also add a scented candle and a box of chocolates.

6. Laugh therapy: Laughter is one of the best ways to relieve caregiver stress. Honor the primary caregiver in your family with tickets to a comedy playing at the local movie theater or a night out to a comedy club. Don’t forget to make arrangements to care for the senior so the caregiver can relax and enjoy their night out.

Visit to Learn More About Respite Care

If a senior in your family isn’t safe on their own, creating an emergency plan is important. In the event the primary caregiver has an emergency of their own, the senior will be well cared for.

A short-term stay at a Legacy Senior Living community can be a part of your plan. Call the community nearest you to schedule a visit to learn more today!

Tax Deductions and Senior Care: What Families Should Know

March 12, 2018

Tax deductions for Senior Care

Wondering if your assisted living expenses are tax deductible? This information from Legacy Senior Living can help you learn more.

When an older adult is ready to downsize and move to a senior living community, families often work together to create a budget and a plan for financing their transition. In fact, how to finance retirement living is one of the questions we receive most often during our conversations with families.

There are many myths and misunderstandings that can make financing senior living especially confusing for seniors and their loved ones. For example, some adult children mistakenly believe a parent’s Medicare will help pay for all or part of their loved one’s assisted living expenses. Unfortunately, it does not. But there are other programs to help finance senior care that are often overlooked.

Financing Senior Living

Here are a few potential funding solutions to explore:

  • Aid & Attendance pension benefits for veterans and surviving spouses
  • Life settlement funding that allows a senior to sell a life insurance policy
  • Short-term loans to help bridge the gap between when a home is sold or asset is liquidated and a senior moves to assisted living
  • Long-term care insurance policies that cover assisted living

Older adults or their families can also meet with a tax advisor to discuss the tax deductions available for senior care expenses.

Senior Care Expenses and Tax Deductions

When it comes to senior care tax deductions, the laws can be more than a little complicated. We typically recommend that families seek the advice of a tax professional who has experience working with aging service providers. An experienced tax advisor will be able to determine if you or your senior loved one meet the qualifications for a tax deduction and how much you are entitled to deduct.

Before your meeting, we suggest you review two different areas of the tax code that pertain to senior living:

  • IRS Tax Publication 502: This publication outlines the medical and dental expense regulations. It will give you a better understanding of what the IRS considers to be medical care and what financial threshold you must meet. It also includes the rule on what a “qualifying relative” is.
  • IRS Tax Publication 503: Like publication 502, this IRS publication further explains dependent care expenses. It also covers which expenses you can deduct for a spouse’s medical care.

Financing Senior Living

While we can’t give you advice on tax deductions for senior living, we can help you explore potential funding solutions. Call the Legacy Senior Living community near you to schedule a time for a personal visit.

Why Don’t Seniors Report When They Are Victims of Fraud?

February 12, 2018

Older adults are targets of scams and fraud.

Seniors are often the target of scams and fraud but rarely report it. Here’s what families should know.

It’s an unfortunate reality but one that is important to be aware of: older adults are targets of scams and fraud more often than any other age group. The problem is further compounded by the fact that when seniors do fall victim to fraud, they often don’t report it to local police.

Research shows that only 1 in 25 fraud-related crimes are reported to law enforcement. This under-reporting makes it difficult for families of seniors to realize there is a problem and help intervene on their loved one’s behalf.

Why aren’t older adults reporting these crimes when they touch their lives?

There are a variety of reasons and some are unique to the perceptions surrounding aging.

3 Reasons Older Adults Don’t Report Fraud

1. Seniors see it is a sign of old age: Falling victim to a crime of this type is often perceived to be a sign of old age. Many people who are older might not want to admit they’ve been scammed for this very reason. They think it is just plain embarrassing to be scammed out of their money at an age when they are supposed to be wise and have learned so many life lessons.

2. Fear of being perceived as incompetent: It shouldn’t be this way, but it often is. When an older adult becomes the victim of a crime, well-meaning loved ones might see it as a sign that they should take over finances. Being responsible for managing our life and budget is closely tied to independence. While some seniors might welcome a little help, losing control completely before they are ready can be demoralizing. The fear of losing this part of their independence might be another reason older adults fail to admit they’ve been victimized, even to their own family.

3. Not sure where or how to report fraud: Another problem that keeps seniors from reporting scams is that they frequently fall victim to a crime through a telephone or online scam. Because of it, they aren’t sure who to inform or how to go about doing so. In most cases, seniors should start by calling their local law enforcement. Local authorities can start the investigation or help connect the senior with the appropriate government agency.

Remember, being the victim of a crime is difficult at any age. For some people, just the idea of being forced to recount the scenario over and over for law enforcement doesn’t seem worth the effort.

This can be especially true in situations where a senior has been victimized via the phone or internet and doubt they will be able to recover any of their assets. They might just want to put the incident behind them and move on. While adult children might disagree with this approach, it might be a time to respect a senior loved one’s feelings and move on, too.

Family Resources for Financing Senior Living

If you are trying to help an older adult you love explore their options for financing senior living, Financing Retirement has helpful resources for you to review. From benefits for veterans to long-term care insurance and life care funding, you are sure to learn more about financing senior living.

6 Ways to Beat Post-Holiday Caregiver Blues

January 15, 2018

post-holiday caregiver bluesAre you suffering from a case of the post-holiday caregiver blues? These 6 tips can help you beat the blues.

It’s that time of year again. The holidays are behind us and the long winter is in front of us. Warm, sunny days can seem far away. For caregivers who may be stuck indoors a lot during colder months, it’s easy to find yourself feeling a little blue.

Experts say 15% of people struggle to stay positive during the winter months. Some even experience a more serious case of seasonal affective disorder, also known as SAD.

If you are a family caregiver who is feeling a little down, this list of post-holiday caregiver blues busters may help boost your mood and lift your spirits.

 6 Blues Busters for Caregivers

1. Get out: While it might be tempting to hibernate until spring, sunshine, combined with fresh air, can be good for the soul. Bundle up, put on skid-proof boots, and head out for a quick trip around the block.

2. Nutrient-rich foods: Many of us turn to carb-heavy comfort foods during the winter, especially if we are feeling a little blue. But they can leave you feeling a little sluggish. A better choice is to fill your plate with nutrient-rich fruits and vegetables, fish, and lean protein. They’ll help you feel more energetic and less lethargic.

3. Limit alcohol consumption: If you are trying to boost your mood by indulging in a cocktail or glass of wine each day, know that the “booze blues” might be making the problem worse. Alcohol is a depressant when consumed in any quantity. Opt for water, tea, or juice instead.

4. Good night’s sleep: A case of the blues can lead to sleep problems. For some caregivers it might be sleeping too much, while others don’t sleep enough. Try a few natural remedies for getting a good night’s rest. If they don’t help, you might need to schedule an appointment with your physician. They will likely have other ideas for you to try.

5. Exercise: While this might not be your favorite way to spend your time, exercise is a great way to beat the blues. When you exercise, endorphins – natural mood boosters – are released in the body. Just thirty minutes of daily exercise can help improve your emotional and physical well-being.

6. Stay connected: Try to stay in touch with friends and loved ones even if the weather outside is frightful. If you aren’t able to get together in person, there are other ways to stay connected like phone calls, Skype, and Facebook.

Caregiving at Legacy Senior Living

If you are starting to explore senior living options for an older adult you love, it’s important to ask the right questions. Many of those questions relate to the experience and quality of a community’s caregivers.

We encourage you to use this list to better understand what questions to ask during your visit Legacy Senior Living and at any other community you are considering.

Holiday Gift Ideas for an Adult Who Lives in a Senior Living Community

December 11, 2017

Christmas gift ideasFinding the right gift for an older adult who lives in a senior living community can be challenging. Here are some gift ideas to help you this holiday season.

Older Americans are typically at a stage in life where they aren’t too keen on accumulating more “stuff.” Many older adults are downsizing and scaling back. If your loved one lives in a senior living community, space may also be limited.

So, what can families do when the holidays roll around and it’s gift-giving season?

What you need are a few good gift ideas for creating that special gift for your loved one. And we have some you might find interesting.

Holiday Gift Ideas for Older Adults

Consider these gift ideas for a senior loved one this holiday season:

  1. A Bit of Nostalgia: Top Music Picks for Your Loved One

Everyone loves music from when they were younger. So why not assemble a list of their favorites and create a personalized playlist or song collection for your loved one? Find out what was popular when they were in high school or ask relatives of the same age if they have any ideas.

Music can be therapeutic, after all, which is another reason it makes a great gift.

  1. Something Practical: Gift Cards

Gift cards come in endless varieties these days, covering almost every hobby or need. A fun idea might be to purchase a wallet or purse and fill it with gift cards.

Think about what the senior’s favorite indulgences are. Do they love books? Shoe shopping? Lunch at a local restaurant? Manicures? Buy gift cards that match their interests.

  1. Something Heartwarming: Family Keepsakes

Family memories become even more precious with time, which is why it’s important to preserve them however you can. Creating a special photo album or family calendar for your senior loved one can be a treasured holiday gift. Websites like Shutterfly offer endless options for you to customize photo products.

The great thing is that this is a gift that keeps on giving. It also provides the gift of spending time together as you reminisce and share a few laughs.

For families whose senior loved one has Alzheimer’s or dementia, photo albums can help reconnect them with positive feelings and memories.

  1. Something to Look Forward to: a Special Calendar

If you live near your senior loved one, you can give them a year’s worth of planned get-togethers as a gift. Buy a pretty calendar and schedule monthly or weekly activities you can do together. Feel free to get as creative as you like, with ice cream dates, morning tea on Thursdays, yoga, or a home-cooked meal every Sunday.

The Team at Legacy Senior Living

As the holidays approach, the team at Legacy Senior Living is here for you in every way. Whether it’s providing you with holiday gift ideas or answering your senior living questions, we are happy to help. Call us to schedule a tour of a community near you!

Holiday Blues: How You Can Help an Older Loved One Prevent Depression During the Festive Season

November 13, 2017

It is not uncommon for seniors to experience depression during the winter holidays. You can help prevent “the holiday blues” by taking a few simple steps.

The winter holiday season should be a time of joy and celebration for everyone in your family, including your senior loved ones. Unfortunately, many seniors struggle with depression or the ‘holiday blues’ this time of year.

There are many reasons that seniors lapse into sadness—illness, injury, frustration with the aging process or loss of a spouse—but what really matters is that you find ways to prevent depression from happening.

The Signs of the Holiday Blues

Knowing the signs of the holiday blues is critical to helping seniors overcome their seasonal sadness. If you get involved early, you’ll dramatically increase your chances of making a difference.

Here’s what to watch for when spending time with your older loved one:

  • Sadness or irritation that doesn’t go away
  • Loss of interest in hobbies or other formerly pleasurable activities
  • Feelings of uselessness or helplessness
  • Feelings of isolation or loneliness
  • Lack of appetite or sudden weight loss
  • Preoccupation with death and dying

While this list gives you a good place to start, it’s important to watch for subtler signs as well. Many seniors aren’t willing to open up about experiencing sadness so take note of any unusual behaviors even if they don’t admit they’re feeling down.

Preventing the Senior Holiday Blues

Here are four effective ways to keep the holiday blues at bay:

  1. Give Freely of Your Time

Nothing is more important than being present for your older loved ones during the holidays. Spending time together can prevent feelings of loneliness and isolation, which are closely associated with the holiday blues. The only caveat is that you give it eagerly, not as though it were a chore.

  1. Listen, No Matter What

Everyone needs to be listened to, especially seniors who are experiencing depression. When you listen closely to someone’s concerns, it’s much easier to empathize and take their problems seriously. This simple acknowledgment of their feelings will go a long way toward alleviating their pain.

  1. Include Your Senior Loved Ones in Your Holiday Activities

A painful feeling of separateness marks most holiday sadness and inclusion is one of the best ways to counter it. Invite your older loved one to participate in shopping, wrapping presents, and decorating the house to remind them that they’re still an important part of the family. Inclusion can also mean asking them for advice and letting them have a say in family holiday decisions.

  1. Help Them Participate in Outdoor Activities

Inactivity and a lack of sunlight can make a senior’s holiday blues even worse so getting them outside can be a big part of the solution. This is especially true if your senior loved one is experiencing Seasonal Affective Disorder.

Activity could include anything they are interested in, but it should involve at least a small amount of mild to moderate exercise.

More Helpful Resources from Legacy Senior Living

A bout of the holiday blues is something seniors experience all too frequently, but that doesn’t mean it’s inevitable. As you can see, there are many things you and your family can do to prevent depression.

Remember that we’re here to help. The Legacy Senior Living blog offers a constant stream of useful information every week. We hope you return to visit often, especially in times of confusion or doubt.

Contact us if you’d like more information or to schedule an in-person tour of one of our communities. We hope the holidays bring you and your family a season of good cheer!