How Assisted Living Promotes Senior Independence

December 2, 2019

Assisted living communities provide just the right balance between support and independence. Learn more about the benefits here.

Maintaining independence can become more challenging with age. While seniors frequently associate moving to an assisted living community with a loss of freedom, the opposite is actually true. Assisted living residents have their own private apartment, with caregivers nearby to provide a helping hand as needed.

Assisted living communities create an individualized care plan for each resident. It acts as a guide for delivering just the right amount of care and support to enable an older adult to remain both safe and independent.

The Benefits of an Assisted Living Community

For some seniors, having a helping hand to stay on track with medications can prevent a mistake that results in a trip to the emergency room. Others find they can take advantage of an assisted living community’s transportation services to see the doctor on a regular basis.

A well-balanced diet helps to nourish the body. It is essential for maintaining muscle mass, which is vital for avoiding a debilitating fall. That’s another way assisted living promotes senior independence.

From opportunities to stay active and engaged to well-balanced meals, assisted living also offers myriad benefits to older adults:

  • Care that changes with needs: While a senior might move to an assisted living community when they are still relatively independent, a good community will offer additional care solutions as an elder’s needs change. That lowers stress associated with future care and provides peace of mind to older adults and their loved ones.
  • Events and activities: From art classes to movie nights, assisted living communities give residents a variety of ways to meet new friends and pursue engaging activities. Both are essential for preventing some of the health conditions associated with isolation and loneliness, such as diabetes and depression.
  • Maintenance-free living: Seniors who have a house to maintain might continue to tackle repairs and household chores that may put them at risk for a fall. Tasks as seemingly simple as climbing a ladder to change a light bulb become more dangerous as you grow older. In an assisted living community, the burdens of homeownership are left behind. Household chores, maintenance, and repairs are taken care of for you.
  • Stay-well programs: A quality assisted living community, such as Legacy Senior Living, places great emphasis on health and wellness. They offer programs designed to help residents live their best quality of life. You’ll find stretching classes, chair yoga, raised beds for gardening, and meditation.
  • Other necessities and conveniences: Assisted living communities also offer a host of other amenities. For example, on-site beauty and barber shops give residents easy access to haircuts, manicures, and other services. Other popular amenities range from aides to assist with pet care to concierge services to sign for packages.

Tour a Legacy Senior Living Community Near You

The holidays are a great time of year to visit and tour an assisted living community. The halls are festively decked and holiday carols abound. Call the Legacy Senior Living community nearest you today to schedule a private visit!

Gift Guide for Seniors in Assisted Living

November 11, 2019

Are you struggling to think of a holiday gift for an older adult who lives in an assisted living community? Here are a few ideas you might find helpful.

Every year as the holidays approach, we hear a familiar question from adult children: what gift can we get our mom or dad? Purchasing a holiday gift for a senior who seems to have everything because they live in an assisted living community where most of their wants and needs are provided.

We do have a few suggestions for gifts residents enjoy and several ideas for meaningful experience gifts.

Holiday Gift Ideas for Assisted Living Residents

  • Personalized stationery:

This is a generation that still believes in writing letters and sending personal thank-you notes. A thoughtful holiday gift might be stationery set with their name and address printed on it, along with address labels, postage stamps, and a nice pen.

  • Plants:

While a senior may not have a lot of extra room in their apartment or suite, there’s always space for plants! In addition to making the home look more inviting, many plants also purify the air.

  • Digital subscriptions:

While many senior living communities offer cable, they don’t usually include subscriptions to specialty channels. You could pay for a yearly membership to Netflix or Hulu so the senior has instant access to movies and favorite television series.

  • Arts and crafts supplies:

Ample research shows the health benefits of engaging in artsy pursuits. From better brain function to a stronger immune system, supplies that spark creativity make for some healthy fun. You can also purchase or put together a fun craft kit or scrapbooking sets, such as drawing supplies or a beginner watercolor package.

  • Indulgence gifts:

A senior on a tight budget might not indulge themselves often. That’s why gifts like a favorite perfume or cologne might be appreciated. A gift certificate for a manicure or hair cut at their assisted living community’s beauty/barbershop or gift cards to local restaurants are also treats.

  • Charitable donations:

You might consider donating to a charity the senior feels passionate about. You could include logo gifts from the charity’s online store. Many sell T-shirts, mugs, hats, and more to raise additional funds.

Giving Experience Gifts during the Holidays

For many older adults, quality time may be the greatest holiday gift of all. You can plan a special outing or gathering to celebrate the season with your loved one. Bringing together several generations of the family is a gift that keeps on giving. Giving Seniors “Experience” Gifts this Holiday Season has a variety of suggestions.

Visit a Legacy Community during the Holidays

If you’ve been considering visiting a senior living community on behalf of a loved one, drop by during the holidays. From joyful choral concerts to games, the holidays are a festive time to visit. Call the Legacy community nearest you to set up a time.

 

Should You Look for Senior Living Close to Your Home or an Adult Child’s?

October 16, 2019

Should you retire near your current home or move near your adult child? Here are a few factors to consider before deciding.

Should you move close to your home or you child's home?

Choosing a senior living community isn’t always easy. With a variety of housing types available, finding the one that best meets your needs can take time and research. One of the first decisions you’ll need to make is where you want to start looking.

Many seniors find themselves debating whether they should move near an adult child’s home or find a senior living community near their current home. Even after exploring communities in both places, the decision may not be clear. If you are struggling, we have a few suggestions that might help.

Where to Search for Senior Living

If you take the following factors into consideration, you’ll likely arrive at an informed decision:

1. Is the quality of senior living better in one area?

This is clearly an important consideration. While most cities and towns have a variety of options from which to choose, some are often better than others. We always recommend families spend time reviewing state survey results of any community they are considering. Many states now publish these online to make it easier for seniors and their adult children to access. Check your state’s Department of Aging or Department of Human Services site for more information.

2. Is your adult child likely to move?

Career choices often require adult children to move to another city or state. Sometimes families are separated by great distances. Another key determinant in deciding if you want to move closer to an adult child is how long they will be there. If their job may require them to move again, you could find yourself alone in a new place without family nearby.

3. Which location offers greater companionship?

Many people want to be close to their loved ones as they grow older. When you are relocating away from a place you lived for decades to an all-new environment, it may be tough to start over. This is especially true if your adult child is busy with a career and family of their own.

If you are a senior who has a wide circle of friends you see often and a social life that you enjoy, staying close to your current home may be best. If you don’t have a supportive circle of friends nearby, relocating closer to family may be a better choice.

4. How well do you adapt to change?

Moving to a senior living community can be a big transition that takes time to adapt to. If you are someone for whom change is difficult, you might find it very difficult to relocate far from your longtime home. A senior living community near your current home might make for an easier transition.

By contrast, if you are someone who loves new adventures, the opportunity to explore a new city or state might be a welcome change.

Senior Living in the Southeast

If your search for a senior living community takes you to Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Tennessee or Virginia, we hope you will make time to visit us. With fourteen senior living communities in the southeast, Legacy offers a variety of options. Contact the community in your desired location to schedule a private tour today!

3 Tips for Parting with a Senior’s Home

September 24, 2019

 

If you are helping a senior loved one prepare to sell their home, the process can be emotional. These tips can make the parting a little easier.

Moving is tough at any age. Cleaning out the closets, arranging for movers, and packing up belongings is a lot of hard work. Parting with a house you love and where you have created good memories can make the transition more difficult. This is especially true for older adults who have often lived in the same house for decades. In many instances, the senior is giving up the home where they raised their family.

If your senior loved one is struggling with this new chapter in life, we have a few suggestions that might help.

Helping a Senior Part with Their Home

1. Document the life and history of the house.

Much of what makes it difficult for a senior to part with their house is likely the memories that were made in it. Finding a meaningful way to document the good times—and bad times—that happened there might make the transition a little less emotional.

You can use old videos to create a story of the home and family over the years. If you don’t have old videos available, there are platforms that allow you to turn photos into a video. Animoto and Smilebox are two free ones to try. You might also consider creating a photo album the senior can look at and enjoy for years to come.

2. Bring a part of the home and garden with them.

An older adult may find it easier to part with their home if they can take a piece of it with them when they move. It might be a few of their favorite flowers from the perennial garden, a raspberry bush from the backyard, or an antique light from the dining room. Help them figure out what they love most about the house and how it may be possible to bring their favorite things along with them.

3. Host a going away party before leaving.

While it may not seem feasible when you are busy packing and preparing to leave, hosting a simple potluck might help your senior loved one find closure. It can give everyone in your family member’s life a chance to celebrate in the home one last time. Be sure to take a lot of photos and videos to document the party!

Be Patient During the Transition

One final suggestion is to be patient with your older loved one and yourself. Change is difficult, and some days will be better than others. If you have realistic expectations, it will likely make the transition easier for the entire family.

Visit a Legacy Senior Living Community

If you are searching for a senior living community in the southeast, we invite you to visit Legacy Senior Living. With locations in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Tennessee, and Virginia, we have options to meet every need and interest. Call us at 423-478-8071 to learn more!

4 Tips for Talking with a Parent about Giving Up Driving

August 19, 2019

Driving represents independence to most adults, including seniors. If you need advice for talking with a loved one about giving up their keys, this will help.

Bringing up the topic of safe driving, or hanging up their keys for good, with a senior parent can be difficult. Adult children typically dread this conversation. It’s often easy to avoid the discussion until a crisis forces the conversation. Hopefully, this will never be the case.

If you are struggling with how to initiate a conversation about driving with a senior you love, we have a few tips that will help.

  1. Demonstrate empathy and kindness.

Before you tackle a sensitive topic like driving, take time to reflect on what this change will mean for your loved one. Not being able to drive can be damaging to a senior’s self-esteem if not handled well. For most people, driving represents independence and freedom.

Giving up driving may also take an emotional toll:

  • Feeling forced to rely on others for transportation
  • Feeling like a burden on a busy loved one’s schedule
  • Feeling frustration at the inability to leave the house freely or without preplanning

Keep these factors in mind as you talk about driving with your senior loved one.

  1. Do some research first.

Before you initiate a conversation about driving with an older loved one, do some research. Explore local transportation services that are accessible and priced fairly. If you create a list of options, so they know they will be able to remain independent, the senior might not be as reluctant to limit or give up driving.

  1. Explore limitations and adaptive equipment.

Some age-related changes can make it more difficult to drive, but that doesn’t always mean the senior should stop driving altogether. Seniors can choose to impose personal limitations on when or how far they drive. There may also be adaptive devices or vehicle modifications that allow a senior to be a safe driver for a few more years.

Consider a few examples that might keep your older loved one driving longer:

  • Avoid nighttime driving: If night vision is an issue, as it is for many seniors, suggest they limit their driving to the daytime.
  • Drive during off-hours: Driving during rush hour can be daunting for people of all ages. Suggest your family member avoid driving during the busiest times of day.
  • Drive only to locations nearby: Encourage your loved one to only drive to locations within a few miles from home, such as to the grocery store or bank. By setting a personal boundary as to how far they drive, seniors can still maintain some independence.
  • Explore adaptive devices: From swivel seat cushions to extra large mirrors, there are a variety of devices designed to overcome common challenges older drivers face. Many are inexpensive and easy to install.
  1. Don’t let age be the primary determinant.

There is no particular age when seniors should stop driving. An older adult’s fitness for driving should be the primary determinant in whether or not it’s time to stop. Is the Senior Driver in Your Family Safe Behind the Wheel has good information and resources for helping you objectively assess a senior’s driving skills.

Transportation Is Available at Legacy Senior Living

One of the most popular services at Legacy Senior Living communities is transportation. Residents rely on it for everything from physician appointments to shopping trips. It’s much easier and less expensive than maintaining a car.

Call us today at 423-478-8071 to learn more!

The Differences between Assisted Living and Nursing Homes

July 22, 2019

If you aren’t sure about differences between assisted living and nursing homes, this information will help you learn more.

When a senior in the family begins to require a little extra help, sometimes their loved ones can be confused about what type of care they need and how to find it. Because the differences in senior living aren’t always obvious, deciding between an assisted living community or a nursing home can be challenging.

People don’t always know that these are two very different types of senior care. Adult children who haven’t been through the process of finding senior living for a family member often think an assisted living community is just a more upscale version of a nursing home.

There are many myths surrounding senior living that further complicate the issue. It’s no wonder families end up confused and unsure about what type of care is the best solution for their loved one.

To help make your search a little easier, we’ll explain the differences between an assisted living community and a nursing home while also dispelling the most common myths.

Dispelling Myths About Assisted Living and Nursing Homes

Myth: The only difference between a nursing home and an assisted living community is their appearance. Both types of senior living offer the same care and services.

Fact: While these two kinds of senior housing typically differ in appearance, the primary contrast is in the types of care and services that are offered. That’s why it is important to learn a little more about each one.

Assisted living communities are home to older adults who need support with life’s daily activities. Some require assistance with personal care (e.g., bathing, grooming, and dressing) and many need help with medication management. These communities are also known for providing well-balanced meals, and a variety of life-enrichment programs every day.

A nursing home is designed for those who require medical care delivered by skilled health care professionals. For example, it would be a solution for a senior who needs skilled nursing assistance with a wound that won’t heal or an older adult with a tracheotomy that requires respiratory therapy.

Myth: Seniors who need help with medication can only go to a nursing home, not an assisted living community.

Fact: While nursing homes do provide medication management services, so do most assisted living communities. In fact, most assisted living residents receive some type of medication support. Considering some older take 5 or more medications/supplements each day, it’s easy to understand why this service is standard in most assisted living communities.

Myth: Only wealthy people can afford an assisted living community.

Fact: This persistent myth might be caused by seniors and their families not understanding all of the services included in the monthly fee. As they learn more, they discover what a true value assisted living can be.

Many of the expenses associated with maintaining a private home are included in the basic monthly fee at an assisted living community—room and board, utilities, basic cable, local phone service, some transportation, healthy meals and snacks, housekeeping, lawn care, and snow shoveling. Other expenses that are often part of the monthly fee are fitness classes and life-enrichment programs.

Myth: Assisted living and nursing home residents don’t have much to do beyond watching television and playing bingo.

Fact: Both assisted living communities and nursing homes offer a variety of daily activities. They tend to be programs that nurture the body, mind, and spirit. The difference is that activities in nursing homes are designed to work around the medical needs and limitations of residents. Some even offer one-on-one activities, such as reading, with nursing home residents who aren’t mobile.

Myth: The food is always terrible in senior communities.

Fact: This is another popular myth that simply isn’t true, especially for assisted living communities. While nursing home residents may have special dietary needs, such as pureed foods, the staff tries to make them both nutritious and delicious.

Assisted living communities often employ chefs to plan menus and supervise cooking. Residents typically have a choice of several menu options at each meal. Because dining rooms are usually restaurant-style, mealtime is often a social affair that residents look forward to each day.

Senior Living Options at Legacy

If you aren’t quite sure what type of care your senior loved one needs, we’ll be happy to help make that determination. With options ranging from independent and assisted living or personal care to memory care and respite, our team knows and understands how to help older adults find the support they need to live their best life. Call us at (423) 478-8071 today!

4 Tips for Making a Smooth Transition to Assisted Living

June 17, 2019

Smooth Transition to Assisted Living

Taking time to prepare for a transition to an assisted living community is vital. These 4 tips will help.

When an older adult is contemplating a move to an assisted living community, they often feel overwhelmed. As do their family members. With so many choices to explore and decisions to make, it’s easy to understand why seniors and their families feel so stressed.

One source of stress often comes from figuring out how to make the process of moving go well. While relocating is tough at any age, for an adult who is giving up their family home, the transition can be emotionally charged.

Here are a few suggestions to make the transition to an assisted living community go a little easier.

4 Tips for Making a Smooth Transition to Assisted Living

Tip #1: Get involved prior to moving.

One step you can take to ensure a smoother transition is to encourage your senior loved one to get involved with the community’s social life before moving day. It’s a great way to meet new neighbors and connect with people who share similar interests.

Another way to get comfortable before moving day is to stop by for a meal or two. Most assisted living communities are happy to have potential residents and their family members enjoy lunch or dinner in the dining room prior to the big day.

Tip #2: Set realistic timelines for moving.

Families often underestimate how much time it takes to downsize and sell a home, even one that isn’t very large. If the senior has lived there for a long time, as many do, it can be physically and emotionally exhausting to clean out their home. Unless this move is the result of an emergency, give yourself time to plan and pack.

Remember, in addition to packing the items that will be going to the assisted living community, you’ll probably need to host an estate sale or garage sale, and arrange to donate unneeded items to charity.

Tip #3: Make the new apartment look familiar.

While it can be tempting to sell or donate the senior’s current belongings and purchase new, it isn’t usually the best way to handle this move. Remember, the senior is relocating to a new environment where they will be surrounded by unfamiliar faces. That can be overwhelming.

Instead, create an environment in their new apartment that looks and feels like “home.” It will likely help your older loved one feel more comfortable and settle in faster.

As you develop a plan for decorating their assisted living apartment, try to include at least a few pieces of their favorite furniture and household belongings. The recliner or love seat they sit on to watch television, bedding from their bedroom, family photos, and familiar wall décor can help the senior feel more at home from the first day they move in.

Tip #4: Understand there will be ups and downs.

As with any major life change, there will be highs and lows during the days leading up to the move and shortly after. This is true not only for the senior, but for family members as well. Your role will likely revert back from hands-on caregiver to spouse or adult child.

For many people, that change can be an adjustment. Give yourself permission to feel down while also making a commitment to accept and embrace the new opportunities this move presents.

If you have questions about assisted living or need more advice for making a smooth transition, we’ll be happy to help. Call the Legacy Senior Living community nearest you for advice!

Tips for Choosing a Senior-Friendly Realtor

May 27, 2019

If you or a senior loved one are searching for a realtor, these tips can help you find and interview potential candidates.

Moving can be physically and emotionally exhausting. In fact, mental health experts rate moving as one of life’s most taxing events. It’s right up there with losing your job or getting a divorce.

Added to this stress is the sentimental aspect of moving. It is fairly common for a senior to have lived in the same house for decades. That can make parting with the home even more difficult. Finding a realtor who has experience and training working with seniors is the can help make the process more manageable.

Common Reasons Older Adults Relocate

Seniors move for many reasons, but there are a few that are the most common. In a study conducted by a relocation specialist, the top three reasons cited were:

  • Declining health: 34% of older adults surveyed said their move was caused by a change in health.
  • More freedom: 10% of respondents were looking for a more carefree lifestyle and fewer home-maintenance burdens.
  • Problems keeping up: 42% of older adults said they were no longer able to keep up with home repairs and maintenance.

Having a licensed real estate agent who understands each of these situations can help make this transition go a little more smoothly. That is one reason the National Association of Realtors created a special designation for realtors who work with seniors.

Choosing a Senior Real Estate Specialist

A realtor who has earned the Seniors Real Estate Specialist® (SRES) credential has undergone additional training. They know the unique challenges older adults face as they prepare to sell their home. You can use your zip code to search the National Association of Realtors online database for a specialist near you.

Once you’ve found a few good candidates who seem capable of selling the senior’s home, it’s time to schedule an in-person interview with each one. If you live too far away to be able to do that, try to use a video chat service like Skype to conduct the interviews.

Here are a few suggestions to ask each of your realtor candidates:

  • What led them to seek the SRES credential?
  • How many seniors have they helped sell their home?
  • How do they go about setting a price for a senior’s home?
  • How do they approach the sale of an older adult’s home differently than that of a younger family?
  • What will they do to market the home?
  • Do they offer advice on staging or other ways to help the senior earn top dollar for the home?
  • How successful is their track record for getting the asking price for a home?
  • Are some months better than others when it comes to selling a senior’s house?
  • Do they have experience working with any senior move managers or moving companies in the area?

Our final tip is to ask for a reference list of families they’ve helped sell a home. That can give you a better understanding of how well they work with and are sensitive to the needs of older sellers.

If you are a senior or an adult child of one looking to make a move, we hope you will keep Legacy Senior Living in mind. With options ranging from independent and assisted living to memory care, we have a variety of solutions for older adults to consider.

Call us at (423) 478-8071 to set up a personal tour!

Helping a Senior Manage Anxiety Before a Move to Assisted Living

April 29, 2019

manage move anxiety

Moving can be distressing. Use these tips to try to help manage move anxiety and make a smooth transition to assisted living.

Moving during the retirement years is much different than moving as a young or middle-aged adult. Seniors who are relocating might find the emotional issues they encounter to be more difficult than the physical challenges moving presents.

For an older adult who has lived in their home for many years, parting with the house can feel like letting go of the happy memories created there. It can also trigger grief and sadness if members of the family have passed away.

The relocation process can lead to anxiety for the senior and stressful days for those who love them. It can make the transition to what should be a new and exciting time in life overwhelming.

Managing Move Anxiety During the Retirement Years

Psychologists call the anxiety seniors encounter before a move relocation stress syndrome (RSS). There are a few ways you can help your elder loved one manage this transition:

  • Include them in decisions: When you are busy juggling a career, a parent’s care, and your own family’s needs, you might try to make most of the decisions about the move yourself. That can make the senior feel like they are losing their independence. Unless your loved one has a health issue that prevents them from participating in the process, include them in as many decisions as seems reasonable. Your goal should be to find the balance between including the family member and overwhelming them with too many unimportant decisions.
  • Maintain an attitude of respect: Sometimes the process of downsizing a senior’s home can get a little contentious. What you see as something to throw away or donate might be a treasure to your aging loved one. Work with the senior and the team at the assisted living community to determine what furniture and belongings will fit and what will need to find a new home. As you do so, remember to be kind and respectful.
  • Create a plan for moving day: Carefully planning for the day of the move is important for reducing stress and anxiety. Pack a suitcase filled with everything your family member will need right away. These supplies may include medication, toiletries, a change of clothing, personal care items, and other daily necessities. Also, assemble a supply box that contains items you may need on moving day, such as a coffee pot and coffee supplies, snacks, towels and washcloths, cleaning products, and trash bags. Put both the suitcase and the box in the car with you instead of sending them with the movers.

Our final suggestion is to encourage your senior loved one to maintain their sense of humor. Despite your best efforts, things may go wrong as the older adult makes this transition. Be patient and try to laugh off the small inconveniences.

Questions about Moving to Senior Living

If you have questions about moving to a senior living community, one of our experienced team members will be happy to provide answers. Call the Legacy Senior Living community nearest you for help!

5 Advantages of Virtual Physician Visit Services

February 25, 2019

As technology improves, more physicians are offering virtual office visits. Here are 5 advantages of virtual physician visit services.

Getting to and from a physician’s office can be challenging for older adults, especially those who live in rural communities or those who’ve given up driving. Many are reluctant to ask a busy adult child for help and aren’t aware of other transportation options. For some seniors, it is a barrier to getting the care they need when they need it.

One option that has been growing in recent years is virtual physician visits. As the technology improves and is easier for seniors to use, the number of physicians offering this service has grown. Insurance companies are seeing the value of virtual visits and including them in their list of covered services.

There are issues to be aware of if you are a senior considering virtual physician visits or the adult child of one. Here’s what older adults and their families should consider.

5 Advantages of Virtual Physician Visit Services

  1. Convenience: Being able to have a face-to-face conversation with a physician from the comfort of your living room is appealing to many. As technology becomes easier to use, even those seniors who aren’t experienced computer users will likely find this service to be convenient.
  2. More focused physician-patient interaction: Physicians are busy professionals, sometimes so busy that patients feel they aren’t being listened to. The doctor might be distracted by other office personnel and patients. Those who have utilized virtual visits often cite the advantage of their doctor’s attention. When it is just the patient and the physician talking by video conference, a doctor can focus more effectively.
  3. No exposure to viruses: Physician waiting rooms are full of sick people. That can expose an older adult, who may have a weaker immune system, to bugs and viruses. Visiting your physician virtually eliminates that risk.
  4. Less time spent waiting: Physicians are notorious for running behind schedule. That leaves patients stuck sitting in the waiting room with nothing to do. It can be stressful and aggravating. When you are waiting for your virtual visit, however, you can relax in the comfort of your own home.
  5. Easier access to specialists: Patients often want to seek a second opinion when they are diagnosed with a health condition. That can be difficult to do for people who live in rural communities. With the help of technology, a patient in Nebraska can meet with a physician in New York virtually to receive advice.

Other Factors to Consider

While virtual physician visits have many advantages, there are a few other factors to consider and ask questions about:

  • How easy is the technology to set up and use? If the senior runs in to problems, how will they go about finding assistance?
  • Does the older adult’s insurance or Medicare pay for virtual visits? If not, how much is the out-of-pocket charge?
  • Is the older adult’s internet connection strong enough? For seniors in rural communities, a lack of good internet options might make virtual visits challenging.

Transportation Provided at Legacy Senior Living

One of the most popular services used by residents of Legacy Senior Living is transportation. Seniors and their families have peace of mind knowing our communities can arrange transportation to and from physician offices. Call the Legacy community nearest you to learn more about this vital resident service.