Holiday Gifts for an Adult with Alzheimer’s

November 26, 2018

If you are having a tough time coming up with holiday gifts for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia, you’ll likely find this guide to be of help.

If you are struggling to come up with a holiday gift idea for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or a similar form of dementia, know that you aren’t alone. Families want to include senior loved ones in holiday traditions like gift giving while also keeping their safety in mind.

That’s why we created this simple holiday gift guide. We hope it will help spark some ideas for a present that will bring joy to your senior family member.

Holiday Gift Ideas for Adults with Alzheimer’s and Dementia

  1. Music: Music has therapeutic benefits, especially for people with memory loss. It can be soothing, calming, or uplifting depending upon the type of music. As a holiday gift, you can purchase an iPod (or even an iPad) and download some of your loved one’s favorite songs. Vinyl record players are also gaining in popularity again. You could buy one along with a few vinyl records of your senior loved one’s favorite artists from youth.
  2. For the birds: If you are the caregiver or family member of an adult with Alzheimer’s, you may have noticed how captivated they are by birds. Whether it is watching birds build a nest, have lunch at the bird feeder, or enjoy a dip in the bird bath, research shows that people with dementia find peace and comfort in birdwatching. The National Audubon Society launched a special initiative, Bird Tales, to help educate people on the role birding can play in improving the lives of people with Alzheimer’s. Depending upon your loved one’s living situation, you can buy a bird feeder and bird food for them to enjoy. If space doesn’t allow for that, you can purchase a bird feeder that attaches directly to window glass. From the comfort of their living room, seniors can watch the birds eat.
  3. Comfort clothing: As Alzheimer’s disease progresses, it can cause problems with mobility, dexterity, and coordination. This makes it more difficult for people to manage personal care needs independently. You can help by purchasing clothes that are easier to get on and off. Jogging suits, shirts that zip up the front (instead of buttons), jeans with an elastic waistband, and sneakers with a Velcro closure make it easier for a senior with a physical impairment to dress on their own.
  4. Fidget blanket: Another holiday gift that can reduce agitation and anxiety in an adult with Alzheimer’s is a fidget blanket. These are tactile blankets that have ribbons, bows, buttons, hooks, family photos, and more attached. For an adult struggling with anxiety or agitation, having a blanket or quilt with fidget activities built in keeps their hands busy. You can find a variety of sellers on Etsy and a list of people who make fidget quilts on Alzheimer’s Support. If you are crafty and want to make one of your own, you will find instructions on the Patchwork Posse website.

We hope this guide helps you find the perfect holiday gift for your senior loved one.

The Talk: Discussing the Need for Memory Care during the Holidays

The holiday season is generally a time of year when families are reunited. It can provide you with an opportunity to talk about your senior loved one’s care needs now and in the days ahead. Memory care might be a solution that helps your loved one safely live their best quality of life.

We invite you and your family to visit the Legacy Senior Living community nearest you. Our dedicated memory care program, The Harbor, is committed to helping adults with dementia live their best quality of life at every stage of the disease. Call us today to schedule a private tour.

Helping a Parent Prepare for Medicare Open Enrollment

October 8, 2018

Medicare open enrollment

Navigating your way through Medicare open enrollment can be confusing. Use this information to help you learn more and get started.

Medicare’s open enrollment period has arrived! As of October 15, seniors and others who participate in Medicare can make changes to their existing coverage. If you are an adult child helping an aging parent navigate their way through this process for the first time, it can be daunting. Many adult children feel anxious, overwhelmed, and fearful that they will make a bad decision.

We thought it would be helpful to the residents of Legacy Senior Living communities and the older adults who follow our blog if we shared a few tips for making the most of Medicare Open Enrollment.

What to Know About Medicare Open Enrollment

Q: How long can we make changes and what are the dates for Medicare Open Enrollment?

A: Medicare Open Enrollment is the same every year: October 15 through December 7. While that might seem like a generous time frame, it can go quickly when you are exploring your options. Be sure to start early and give yourself plenty of time.

Q: If I make changes on my parent’s behalf, when do they take effect?

A: Changes made during open enrollment go into effect on January 1 of the following year.

Q: What is Medicare Advantage Plan?

A: Medicare Advantage Plans are offered by private health insurance companies. These plans fall under a senior’s Medicare Part C benefit. Insurance companies contract with Medicare to provide health care services to seniors.

Some of these plans offer very cost-effective solutions for older adults with benefits that might extend to prescription coverage or even hearing aids. It’s important to do your research, however, as these plans can vary widely.

Q: Do Medicare recipients who are satisfied with their current coverage need to do anything?

A: Unless you indicate otherwise, your current coverage will be automatically renewed. There are a few steps to take to ensure that your plan or your parent’s plan will remain the same. That includes checking to be sure current physicians, pharmacies, hospitals, and outpatient centers will still participate. Remember, some providers opt out of our plans and even traditional Medicare.

Carefully review the “Evidence of Coverage” (EOC) and “Annual Notice of Change” (ANOC) documents you or your parent received in the mail. These notices will list any plan changes for the upcoming coverage year.

Q: Where can I learn more about plans and coverage in my parent’s area?

A: You can use Medicare.gov to search for options near you or your parent. If you would prefer to talk to someone by phone, call 1-800-MEDICARE (633-4227) for help.

Finally, every state has personal help available, but you will need to contact them early as their schedules are busy during the open enrollment period. Find the contact information for your state here.

How Much Do Life Enrichment Activities in Senior Living Really Matter?

September 17, 2018

Painting a landscape

Life enrichment activities improve the lives of residents in senior living communities. Use these tips to evaluate a community’s activities program on a senior’s behalf.

When older adults and their families begin the search for a senior living community, they are sometimes overwhelmed by the sheer number of options. Moving to an independent living or an assisted living community offers the chance to get involved in activities and programs with fellow residents.

What you will discover, however, is that life enrichment programs can vary greatly from one community to another. Some communities offer a wide variety of activities and wellness programs, while others offer only those required by state regulations.

So how important are life enrichment and wellness programs? Do they make a difference in how happy, healthy, and engaged a resident is?

Here’s what researchers have to say about the issue.

Staying Active and Engaged after Retirement

Much has been written recently about the dangers of a sedentary life, especially for seniors. It puts people at higher risk for everything from falls to depression and obesity. Some health professionals go as far as saying a sedentary lifestyle is just as dangerous as smoking.

A few more reasons why it’s important to find a senior living community committed to a wide variety of life enrichment programs include:

  • Protecting cognitive health: A 2010 study published in the New England Journal of Medicine highlighted how important staying socially active is for cognitive health. Participating in activities that challenge and stimulate the brain can protect cognitive function.
  • Avoiding the dangers of isolation: The Journal of Health and Social Behavior published a study in 2009 that found that “social disconnectedness and perceived isolation are independently associated with lower levels of self-rated physical health” in older adults. This includes higher incidences of obesity, diabetes, depression, high blood pressure, and more.

How to Evaluate a Senior Living Community’s Life Enrichment Program

As you are visiting and touring senior living communities on a loved one’s behalf, here are a few tips to help you evaluate the strength of their life enrichment programs:

  • Review the calendar: Ask to see copies of the community’s most recent activity calendars. Try to get calendars for at least two or three months so you can get a true picture of how many and what types of activities are offered.
  • Assess the activities: Does the calendar show a broad range of activities? Ideally, you will find programs and events that engage the body, mind, and spirit. Also compare the scheduled activities with your family member’s hobbies and interests. Are there things they enjoy? Or things they’ve always wanted to try? If a hobby or interest of your loved one isn’t listed, is it possible to have it added to the schedule?
  • After hours and weekends: Also look at what happens during the evening hours and on weekends. Are events and activities scheduled then? You want to make sure there are meaningful activities scheduled seven days a week, not just during traditional business hours.

Our final suggestion is to review the current activities calendar at any community you are seriously considering. Look for a few programs that seem appealing to your family member. Ask the staff if you and your loved one can participate in one or two. It can provide you with good insight about what community life would be like and give you a chance to meet residents.

At Legacy Senior Living communities, life enrichment activities are an integral part of everyday life. We often say our events calendar might remind you of a cruise ship, with programs, events, outings, and activities happening throughout the day. Our activities staff works hard to offer ample social opportunities for residents each day. Schedule a tour to learn more today!

A Commitment to Caring at Legacy Senior Living

July 23, 2018

Learn how team members are celebrated and rewarded at Legacy Senior Living communities throughout the Southeast.

At Legacy Senior Living communities throughout the Southeast, you will find dedicated teams of caregivers committed to providing our residents with the highest quality of care and service. We strive to treat all residents with honor, respect, faith, and integrity no matter what their needs or circumstances. That means we support those residents with active, independent lifestyles, as well as those who require special care.

Because we believe that how well we treat caregivers will be reflected in how well they treat our residents, we established programs that recognize and honor the work of our caregivers and support team members.

Honoring the Caregivers Who Support Our Residents

Here are just a few of the ways we reward our team members:

  • “Going the Extra Mile”: Through this program, we reward our caregivers monthly, quarterly, and annually. From monetary incentives to professional training opportunities, our goal is to honor team members who go the extra mile for residents and colleagues. In May of 2018, Ashley Ford from our Grace Senior Living community in Douglasville, Georgia, was named the Legacy Champion of the Year. She was chosen for this honor from nearly 500 eligible team members. Her commitment to going the extra mile in every aspect of her professional career makes her a popular employee with residents, colleagues, and family members.
  • Legacy Rewards: Employees at Legacy communities earn points for exhibiting positive behaviors, such as good attendance, length of service, on-time track record, and more. These points can be redeemed for gift cards or merchandise through our Legacy Rewards program.
  • Legacy Cares Fund: Because we know life often comes with unexpected ups and downs, we created the Legacy Care Fund. It is designed to provide financial assistance to employees who experience a hardship. Employees can contribute to the fund, as well as receive support during a crisis.

Legacy Senior Living Serves Seniors in the Southeast

With more than a dozen campuses throughout the Southeast, we are pleased to share that Legacy Senior Living is routinely recognized as the best in senior living in the areas we serve. This recognition is evidence that when you treat employees well, they will provide the quality of care residents and their families desire.

We invite you to contact the Legacy community nearest to you or your senior loved one to set up a private tour at your earliest convenience!

Senior Care 101: Understanding the Different Types of Care and Support for Older Adults

June 20, 2018

Senior Care 101

Here’s Senior Care 101. Learn more about the different types of senior living, independent living, assisted living, and memory care.

If you are considering a move to a senior living community or helping an older family member explore their options, understanding the difference between each type of senior care isn’t always easy. But the distinctions are important. Making the best decision requires learning more about each type of care, as well as the services and amenities offered.

3 Distinct Levels of Senior Living

At Legacy Senior Living communities, there are three distinct levels of care:

  • Independent living for the more active senior
  • Assisted living for an older adult who needs a little support
  • Memory care for adults with dementia

In many instances, an older adult chooses to move to a senior living community when they are active and independent. This allows them to take advantage of the community’s life enrichment and wellness programs.

As the resident’s needs for care change, they are able to move through the care continuum to receive assisted living or memory care support.

What is Independent Living?

Independent living communities are designed to provide active older adults with an option for a lifestyle that is free from the burdens of home ownership. This gives them time to travel, take continuing education classes, volunteer, pursue new hobbies, and reconnect with old friends.

Independent living community residents enjoy and benefit from the following services and amenities:

  • Choice of apartments and floor plans
  • From repairing the oven to mowing the lawn, all home maintenance and repairs are handled for residents
  • Social, recreational, and educational activities to participate in every day
  • Peace of mind that comes from knowing security is onsite 24/7
  • Delicious, well-balanced meals served restaurant style in the dining room
  • Wellness programs designed to help residents live longer, healthier lives
  • Access to assisted living and dementia care if the need arises

The Support of an Assisted Living Community

Assisted living residents benefit from the privacy of their own apartment combined with the care and support they need always close by.

In addition to a comfortable apartment, assisted living residents benefit from the following:

  • An individual plan of care created for each resident based on their unique needs and struggles
  • Around-the-clock caregivers to provide assistance with daily activities such as bathing, dressing, grooming, and toileting
  • Robust calendar of life enrichment activities, wellness programs, and community outings
  • All housekeeping, maintenance, and daily linens provided
  • Utilities, basic cable television, and local phone service included
  • Transportation for community outings, errands, and appointments

Memory Care for Adults With Dementia

Memory care communities are designed to help adults with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia live their best quality of life despite their disease. Caregivers are trained to support a resident’s remaining abilities, helping them feel more independent and empowered.

Here are a few of the services and amenities found in Legacy’s memory care communities, known as The Harbor:

  • A safe and secure environment designed to prevent resident wandering
  • Specialized caregivers who understand the unique needs of adults with dementia
  • Nutritious meals served in an environment that minimizes distractions
  • Life enrichment activities and wellness programs that help people with dementia feel successful
  • Laundry and housekeeping services
  • Unique therapy programs, such as The Purposeful Day and Simple C, that help residents live their best life every day

Schedule a Private Visit Today

If you have questions about what type of care is best for you or an older adult in your family, or if you would like to schedule a private tour, please call the Legacy Senior Living community nearest you today!

Honoring Our Emergency Responders

May 21, 2018

National EMS Week

This week of May is National EMS Week. Learn more about this celebration and an initiative designed to help people learn how to react during a medical crisis.

Emergencies happen when we least expect them. Sometimes it’s a car accident on the way to work that results in an injury. Other times it might be a child who is hurt playing in the yard. For older adults, however, falls around the home are the leading cause of disability and one of the top reasons seniors end up in a hospital emergency room.

When the unexpected happens, most of us rely on 911 for help.

In Legacy Senior Living communities, first responders are called on to transport residents to local hospitals when emergency health problems arise. The quick response from Emergency Medical Services (EMS) combined with the support of our own experienced care team members helps residents receive the emergency medical intervention they need.

National EMS week kicks off on May 20th this year. It is a time to thank our first responders for all they do to keep our communities safe. It is also a time to raise awareness of how to react during a medical crisis.

The History of EMS Week

EMS Strong: Stronger Together is the theme for this year’s week-long celebration. National EMS Week is an effort coordinated by the American College of Emergency Physicians and the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. EMS Week dates back to an initiative signed by President Gerald R. Ford. This week-long campaign focuses on education, awareness, and recruitment.

One area emergency physicians want people to pay special attention to is what everyday citizens can do to help someone in distress while they are waiting for first responders. The program is called Until Help Arrives.

What to Do Before Help Arrives

The Until Help Arrives program was created to encourage and empower the public to react calmly and methodically when they are in the midst of a life-threatening crisis.

The five-step program includes the following:

  1. Call 911
  2. Protect the injured from harm
  3. Stop bleeding
  4. Position people so they can breathe
  5. Provide comfort

Along these same lines is a public awareness effort to encourage people to learn how to calmly, safely, and efficiently perform CPR. Everyone from babysitters to family caregivers can benefit from learning how to perform this life-saving procedure.

Your local chapter of the American Red Cross is typically the best resource for locating a CPR workshop.

Visit a Legacy Community Today

If an older adult in your life is struggling to stay safe at home, the support of an assisted living community might be an ideal solution. The senior can receive the support they need to remain independent. Call the Legacy community nearest you to set up a time to visit and learn more.

How Respite Care Helps Families Enjoy a Vacation Together

April 16, 2018

Respite care helpsIf you are a family caregiver trying to plan a summer vacation with your own children, respite care might help. Learn more from Legacy Senior Living.

Family caregivers provide support that is crucial to the health and wellness of older Americans. The AARP estimates that family caregivers provide nearly $470 billion in unpaid care each year. From helping with bathing and grooming to preparing meals, providing transportation to physician appointments, and managing medications, it’s a rewarding but demanding role.

Being “on duty” 24 hours a day, seven days a week can take its toll on the caregiver’s own well-being. That’s why it’s important to take breaks and try to continue some semblance of a normal routine. One way to do this might be to take a summer vacation with your own family.

Summer is one of the busiest times of year for senior living communities that provide respite care. That’s because respite care is a solution that gives the family peace of mind and the senior an opportunity to enjoy a getaway of their own.

Legacy communities often receive calls in the spring and summer months from families who aren’t sure what respite really involves and how to go about finding a provider.

Let’s talk a little more about the questions families commonly ask about respite care.

What is Respite Care?

Respite care is a short-term care solution designed to give the caregiver a break. Sometimes it is just for a short period of time to attend to household duties and maintenance. Other times it is to allow the family caregiver to travel.

Respite residents receive the same level of personal care and support as long-term residents do. They also participate in life enrichment programs and wellness activities, as well as enjoy socializing with other residents at meal times.

Meanwhile, caregivers get a break from their duties. They also have peace of mind knowing their loved one is safe and enjoying a mini-vacation of their own.

Once you decide respite care might be a good solution, the next step is to tour a few senior living communities to find one that will be a good fit for your loved one.

What Caregivers Should Know About Respite Care

What should you look for when you visit a senior living community to learn more about respite care?

This checklist can help you feel confident about the senior living community you choose for your loved one’s short-term respite stay:

  • What safety and emergency call systems are in place for residents?
  • How will the community get to know your loved one’s needs and interests?
  • What does the staff do to help your loved one settle in?
  • Do respite residents have access to the same services as long-term residents do?
  • Do respite residents eat in same dining room as long-term residents?
  • What services and support will your loved one receive each day?
  • What happens when your loved one needs help overnight?
  • Will the community provide assistance with laundry and housekeeping?
  • How does the staff help respite residents meet people and connect in meaningful ways during their stay?
  • Do the community, staff, and residents feel warm and welcoming?
  • Is the respite apartment or suite inviting?
  • Will someone invite and escort your loved one to the community’s events and activities?
  • Can respite guests use the community’s transportation services?
  • How much is the daily rate for respite, and what other charges should you expect to incur?

If you are considering respite care for someone you love this spring or summer, we extend an open invitation to you to visit one of the Legacy communities. We’d love it if you stayed for lunch or dinner, too!

A Look Back at Black History Month Over the Years

February 26, 2018

Woodson and Black History Month 2018Learn more about Black History Month including the role a man named Dr. Carter G. Woodson played in shining the spotlight on the contributions of black Americans.

The roots of Black History Month date back to the year 1926 and a man named Dr. Carter G. Woodson. A child of former slaves, Dr. Woodson spent his boyhood in Kentucky working in the coal mines. It wasn’t until the age of 20 that he started high school. He graduated within two years and went on to study at Harvard, where he was awarded a Ph.D.

After his studies were complete, Dr. Woodson took on a new challenge. Because he was dismayed to discover history books at the time largely ignored the contributions of black Americans, in 1915 he established the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, now known as Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

But that wouldn’t be the end of his attempts to shine the spotlight on the contributions of black Americans.

Black History Month is Celebrated in February

In 1926, Dr. Woodson launched an annual initiative to bring national attention to the contributions of black people throughout American history. He chose February for Black History Month. Among the reasons he cited for doing so were the birthdays of two men who had an impact on the lives of black Americans: Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.

Black History Month Statistics and Trends

In 2017, Pew Research released a study highlighting the progress of black Americans. Some of their most notable findings include:

  • While more black Americans are completing high school, they still haven’t caught up with their Caucasian peers. 93% of white adults age 25 and older have a high school diploma compared with 88% of black adults.
  • The number of black Americans with a bachelor’s degree continues to trend upward. It reached 23% in 2015.
  • Members of Congress who are black reached an all-time high in 2017, up to 50 (47 in the House and 3 in the Senate) from a total of 13 in 1971 (12 in the House and 1 in the Senate).
  • Significant gaps in income still exist. In 2015, the median household income for black Americans was $44,100 versus $75,100 for whites.
  • When it comes to median net worth, white households had a combined wealth in 2013 that was roughly 13 times greater than that of black households coming in at $144,200 for white households and $11,200 for black households.
  • The poverty rate has fallen for black Americans dipping from 31.1% in 1976 to 24.1% in 2015.
  • 61% of black Americans say race relations in the U.S. are generally bad, and only 34% believe race relations are generally good.

2018 Black History Month

The 2018 theme for Black History Month will be African Americans in Time of War. You can visit the Association for the Study of African American Life and History to learn more about planned activities and events.

Identity Theft Prevention in the Wake of Corporate Hacks

January 29, 2018

Identity theft has become a serious threat across the country. Major corporations have even fallen victim. Here’s what you need to know to keep a senior safe.

The New Year rings in the beginning of tax season, and adult children often help their senior parents with this process. Some families play a more hands-on role than others. One thing the entire family should be aware of is that seniors are being targeted more and more for identify theft during tax season each year.

The Federal Trade Commission says that 36% of adults 50 years of age and older fall victim to identity theft every year. An increasing number of these cases are related to taxpayer identity theft and fraud.

Common Types of Identity Theft

Unfortunately, scammers are always on the lookout for opportunities to take advantage of people they think are vulnerable and have good credit. For these criminals, older adults often fit this description.

By stealing their identity, the criminal can apply for credit cards and loans in the senior’s name. A few common tactics scammers use to get your loved one are:

  • Junk mail claiming the senior has an unclaimed prize or vacation
  • Phishing emails promoting contests or unclaimed prize money
  • Phone calls claiming to be from a grandchild in trouble

A very common scam during tax season is a fake call from the IRS claiming the senior owes money that must be paid immediately by phone.

Remind your senior loved one that neither the IRS nor any other government agency will call demanding money. They will communicate via written correspondence.

What Adult Children Should Know About Senior Identity Theft

From phishing scams to theft of mail, here’s what else you should do to protect an older loved one.

Store Medicare and insurance cards in a safe location.

Having your purse or wallet stolen or lost is a hassle at any age. Older adults are more likely to carry personal information that can put them at risk for identify theft.

Help a senior find a safe location at home to store:

  • Social Security card
  • Documents that contain their Social Security number
  • Medicare and health insurance cards

Encourage your loved one to leave these documents at home unless they need them for a specific appointment that day.

Consider enrolling with an identity theft protection company

Another option for seniors to consider is enrolling with a company designed to protect credit and identity. Consumers Advocate suggests exploring:

  • LifeLock
  • com
  • MetLife Defender

Review the senior’s credit report at least once a year

Another way to prevent identity theft is by reviewing the senior’s credit report at least once a year. Credit agencies are required by law to furnish one free copy of this report each year. If you review it together you can look for suspicious activity and incorrect information.

If you find something that doesn’t look right, contact the credit bureau to dispute the finding. And if you don’t feel like you are getting resolution, you might need to enlist the services of an identity protection service, an attorney, or even the local police.

Monitor bank and credit card statements regularly

You might also want to extend an offer to your parent to sit down every month or so to help them review their bank and credit card statements. If you live far away, you can do this online. It’s just one more way of protecting your loved one from identity theft or another form of financial fraud.

Legacy Senior Living Blog

Here on the Legacy Senior Living Blog you’ll find other informative and timely posts about all sorts of topics, like how to honor the veterans in your local community, or how to keep a senior loved one safe on Facebook. We hope you will bookmark our blog and stop back often!

Can Assisted Living Help Prevent Repeated Trips to the Emergency Room?

December 25, 2017

Frequent ER Visits

It is not uncommon for older adults to require frequent visits to the emergency room. Moving to an assisted living community can help prevent some of them.

It’s an unfortunate truth that older adults are much more likely to require trips to the emergency room than younger people. Though some of these trips are inevitable, others are preventable under the right conditions. Assisted living communities provide an environment  that may help to keep seniors from making frequent ER visits.

4 Ways Assisted Living Helps Prevent Trips to the Emergency Room

Here are a few ways an assisted living community help seniors avoid the hospital:

  1. Medication Management Support

For most people, the number of daily medications required for optimum health increases with age. Not surprisingly, this can lead to a great deal of confusion, especially when medications have different dosage amounts and are taken at differing times throughout the day.

Unfortunately, this confusion can be dangerous. Mistakes with medication is a leading reason older adults end up in the emergency room. Most assisted living communities offer medication management services that help residents stay safely on track with their medication.

  1. Living Environments Specifically Designed to Decrease Falls

Falls are the number one cause of injury among older adults in the United States and one of the most common reasons they end up in the emergency room. Additionally, falls account for a great deal of anxiety on the part of both older adults and their families.

From bathroom grab bars to walk-in showers and handrails in the walkways, assisted living communities are designed to help protect residents against dangerous falls. The result is increased peace of mind and fewer trips to the hospital.

  1. Improved Health Through Better Nutrition

Inadequate nutrition can render older adults much more susceptible to illnesses and injuries that lead to emergency room visits. Seniors who live alone and don’t eat nutritious meals can be at greater risk for repeated hospital visits, costly medical bills, and fall-related injuries.

Assisted living communities address this concern by providing thoughtfully designed, nutritious meals. These meals help to not only improve the overall well-being of assisted living residents, but to create opportunities for socializing with friends in the dining room.

  1. Assisted Living Wellness Programs

Most assisted living communities offer onsite wellness programs. These programs take a holistic approach to overall well-being. At Legacy Senior Living communities, we are committed to quality care. From fall prevention programs to our service standards, we help residents live their best life.

Contact us today to find out more about our services or to arrange an in-person tour of one of our communities.