Are Lifestyle Choices Impacting Your Risk for Heart Disease?

February 4, 2019

 lower your risk for heart disease

Can lifestyle choices lower your risk for heart disease? Researchers say it can. Use these tips to lower your risk for heart disease.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death worldwide. Despite all of the advances in medicine, cardiac-related illnesses claim more lives than any other disease or medical condition. Estimates are that one in four deaths can be attributed to heart disease.

But researchers say it doesn’t have to be this way. Many of the risk factors for heart disease can be controlled with lifestyle modifications. In honor of National Heart Month, here is a list of steps you can take to lower your risk for heart disease.

Lifestyle Choices that Lower Your Risk for Heart Disease

  • Kick the habit: Smoking is one of the leading causes of heart disease. One out of five heart-related deaths in this country can be attributed to cigarette smoking. If you are a smoker, do your heart a favor and stop.
  • Stay active: A sedentary lifestyle or a lack of exercise also raises the risk for heart disease. You can manage that by exercising at least 150 minutes a week and avoid sitting for long periods of time.
  • Skip processed foods: Americans eat a lot of packaged and processed foods. While they are convenient when the days are busy, these types of foods are typically high in sodium. Too much sodium increases blood pressure putting you at a higher risk for cardiac-related illnesses.
  • Eat a healthy breakfast: Leaving the house without eating a healthy breakfast increases the likelihood that you will binge on unhealthy fare later. Foods like doughnuts and pastries are high in saturated fat and low in protein. Opt for a well-balanced breakfast high in fiber and protein, such as a bowl of oatmeal or a smoothie.
  • Get a good night’s rest: Many people underestimate the importance of sleep. Too little sleep increases the chance of making bad choices during the day, such as eating the wrong foods or sitting too much. Most health experts recommend seven-to-nine hours of sleep each night.
  • Eat sweets in moderation: Elevated blood sugar levels have been linked to heart disease, especially among women. The American Heart Association recommends limiting added sugars in your diet to six teaspoons per day for women and nine teaspoons per day for men.
  • Limit alcohol consumption: Many people are surprised to learn that consuming too much alcohol can also put you at risk for heart disease. While some studies show red wine may be good for your heart, moderation is the key. Talk with your physician for a recommendation on how much alcohol is acceptable based on your personal medical history.
  • Manage daily stress: While it’s unrealistic to think you can completely eliminate stress from your life, finding healthy ways to manage stress is important for your heart. Walking, swimming, meditating, Pilates, and yoga are a few methods to try.
  • Drink green tea: Another way to keep your heart healthy is drinking green tea every day. Researchers say green tea may help manage LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, which are both risk factors for heart disease.
  • Find a doctor you trust: Having a close relationship with a physician can help you manage your overall health and well-being, including your heart. You are more likely to stay on track with preventative tests and screenings if you are comfortable with your physician.
  • Learn about Blue Zones: There are areas around the globe where people live longer, healthier lives. They are referred to as Blue Zones. People who live in these areas have lower incidences of heart disease and Alzheimer’s.
  • Get organized: When your life and home are cluttered and disorganized, you are more likely to feel stressed and even depressed. By getting clutter under control and organizing your life, you reduce stress and improve your well-being.
  • Learn to journal: Keeping a daily journal, one that you use to document the day’s ups and downs, is another heart-healthy step you can take. If you are a caregiver, it can be an especially effective tool for managing caregiver stress.

To learn more about heart health, we encourage you to visit the American Heart Association online. You’ll find a variety of heart-related resources that range from recipes to research projects.

Follow the Legacy Senior Living Blog

If you are an older adult or the caregiver for one, you will find the Legacy Senior Living Blog to be a good resource. Throughout the month we share tips and news related to aging well, caregiving, senior living, and more. We encourage you to bookmark the blog and stop back often!

Is It Time to Consider Assisted Living?

January 28, 2019

6 Signs a Senior Needs Assisted Living

Are you wondering if it is time for a senior in your family to move to assisted living? These six signs that an older adult is struggling can help you decide.

A question we often receive from the families of seniors is how to tell when it’s time for a move to assisted living. While some older adults are excited to move to a community that offers many opportunities for friendship and life enrichment activities, others are more reluctant to make a change.

If this is a question your family is grappling with, we can help. Finding an answer starts with recognizing the warning signs that might indicate a senior is struggling at home.

6 Signs a Senior Needs Assisted Living

  1. Change in personal hygiene: Have your parent’s personal hygiene habits declined? Is their appearance not quite as tidy as in the past? Are they wearing clothes that are not appropriate for the season or the time of day? These may seem like inconsequential details, but they aren’t. A marked decline in personal care can be a sign an older adult is having difficulty keeping up.
  2. Unintended weight gain or weight loss: Another sign a senior might benefit from a move to an assisted living community is if they are gaining or losing weight. This change may be due to a poor diet. Because cooking for one often seems like too much work, an older adult might skip meals or rely on fast food and convenience foods. Another reason is that they’ve given up driving and are having difficulty getting to and from the grocery store often enough.
  3. Errors with medication: Seniors may take several different types of medication each day. This can increase their risk for medication errors. According to Pharmacy Times, almost half of the two-billion prescriptions filled each year are incorrectly taken. Check to see if your loved one is on track by comparing the number of pills left in their medication bottles with the number prescribed. Having too many or too few left can indicate a problem.
  4. Making money mistakes: Another red flag that a senior is struggling is making mistakes with finances. A few signs that indicate an older adult is having difficulty managing their finances include phone calls from creditors, a stack of past-due bills, or a senior unable to identify credit card charges.
  5. Decline in housekeeping: The condition of a senior’s home can also tell a tale. If your parent’s home has always been neat and in good repair, a disheveled, dirty house isn’t a good sign. Check their refrigerator for expired foods. Notice if trash or laundry are piled up. Also, look for neglected maintenance tasks, such as burned-out light bulbs or a leaky faucet.
  6. Withdrawing from social activities: Stepping back from favorite volunteer projects and giving up going to church or synagogue are other warning signs. Sometimes withdrawal is due to a lack of transportation, but other times it can be a sign of cognitive change. For example, isolated seniors are at a higher risk for depression.

These are just a few of the most common signs that a senior is struggling and could benefit from assisted living. If you are still wondering if assisted living is the right choice, we’ll be happy to help you understand all of your senior care options. Call the Legacy Senior Living community nearest you to learn more.

What is Reminiscence Therapy for Adults with Alzheimer’s?

January 21, 2019

reminiscence therapy for adults with Alzheimer’s

If a senior you love has Alzheimer’s disease, reminiscence therapy can help them reconnect with happy memories.

When a senior loved one has Alzheimer’s disease, family members may struggle to find ways to help them feel engaged and connected to the world around them. Short-term memory is often affected early in the disease process, leaving the senior feeling isolated and alone. That’s where programs like Reminiscence Therapy can help.

Reminiscence Therapy (RT) is based on the idea that recalling happy memories helps families to bond and allows a senior to relive positive experiences from the past.

It works because it doesn’t rely on the individual’s impaired short-term memory. The practice of reminiscence utilizes long-term memory that might still be intact. Researchers believe this therapy can help reduce anxiety and depression among adults with dementia.

We have a few ideas to help you utilize Reminiscence Therapy at home.

Utilizing Reminiscence Therapy with a Senior Loved One

  • Ask long-time friends and family members to share copies of old photographs. Explain that your goal is to help your loved one reconnect with photos that will elicit happy memories.
  • Think about what other items may trigger positive memories. Was your loved one a teacher? Put together a box of supplies they may have used for teaching, such as a ruler, a small chalkboard, and an assignment journal.
  • Music is another avenue for connecting with the past. Create a play list of your family member’s favorite music from their youth. Talk about the artists who sang each song and the memories they recall when listening.
  • Like music, old movies are another way to reminisce. Find DVDs of some old classics that you can watch together. It might be fun to include younger members of the family too!
  • Aromatherapy doesn’t always have to be a fancy diffuser and essential oils. Baking can also trigger recollections of happy times. For example, the smell of an apple pie or pecan rolls in the oven may help a senior remember pleasant memories with a parent or grandparent.

Memory Care at Legacy Senior Living

At Legacy Senior Living communities, we’ve earned a reputation for excellence in caring for adults with Alzheimer’s and related forms of dementia. In our memory care communities, called The Harbor, we are committed to helping each resident live their best quality of life.

From a home-like setting to thoughtfully planned meals, we invite you to schedule a personal tour to learn more. Call the Legacy community nearest you to set up a time today!

What to Consider Before Becoming a Power of Attorney (POA) for a Loved One

January 14, 2019

Read this important information before agreeing to become a power of attorney (POA) for a friend or family member.

An important legal document for older adults to have is a power of attorney, often referred to as a POA. It allows you to designate someone to act on your behalf if you are unable to make decisions for yourself.

There are four basic POA categories:

  • General Power of Attorney: Awards a designee wide-ranging power, such as the authority to pay bills or hire and pay an in-home caregiver.
  • Special Power of Attorney: Can be granted for a specific, one-time purpose. For example, to sign home purchase paperwork, if you will be out-of-state, or to sell a car if you can’t be there to handle the sale.
  • Health Care Power of Attorney: Gives a person you designate authority to make health-related decisions on your behalf if you are unable to do so.
  • Durable Power of Attorney: A provision that ensures your wishes are maintained and the authority of your POA is honored in the event you become mentally incapacitated.

If a senior in your life asks you to act as a POA, it might be tempting to agree without considering what the role really entails. But there are important details to think through before you accept a request to become a POA for a friend or family member.

Are You the Best Person to be a POA?

Here are a few factors to understand about POA responsibilities:

  • Do you live close enough to quickly get to the senior’s home in the event of an emergency?
  • Are you comfortable making tough decisions? This is especially important for those who will be a health care POA.
  • Do you feel at ease managing or overseeing financial affairs? A POA will often need to assist with bill paying, asset liquidation, and overall financial support.
  • While this one may be tough to consider, family dynamics can make accepting a POA role too difficult. When families can’t agree, hiring an attorney or other professional to fulfill the POA role might be better.
  • If you know your loved one’s wishes aren’t shared by other family members, will you be strong enough to stand up to peer pressure? A POA’s job is to make sure the senior’s directives are followed.
  • Is your health good enough to take on these responsibilities? Many POAs aren’t required to act very often. But in the event of a crisis, the role can become very demanding so it is important to consider your health before accepting.

Financing Senior Living

One task a POA might be called to assist with is selecting a senior living community and creating a budget to finance it. “Financing Your Retirement” is a resource we created to help you learn more.

We cover options from the Aid & Attendance program for veterans to exploring life care funding. If you have additional questions, please call us at (423) 478-8071. We’ll be happy to help you find the answers you need!

5 Healthy Caregiver Resolutions for 2019

January 8, 2019

5 Healthy Caregiver Resolutions for 2019

Caregivers often neglect their well-being when caring for a loved one. Use these 5 healthy caregiver resolutions to make 2019 a healthier, better balanced year.

The beginning of a new year offers each of us a time to start over and set goals for living a healthier life. If you are a caregiver, the stress of juggling multiple responsibilities may be taking its toll. It’s no secret that caregiving can be mentally, emotionally, and physically exhausting.

As we head into 2019, we thought it would be helpful to share a few warning signs of caregiver burnout along with some preventative strategies.

The Toll of Caregiving for a Senior Loved One

Gallup Industries polled caregivers and found that the health-related problems caregivers cited most often included:

  • chronic pain
  • knee, back, and leg problems
  • high blood pressure
  • unintended weight gain
  • neck and back aches
  • migraines and headaches
  • general fatigue

If you are a caregiver experiencing any of these symptoms, it might be time to make your own health a priority.

5 Healthy Caregiver Resolutions to Make in 2019

  1. Examine your diet: Because the role of caregiver is such a busy one, caregivers often turn to convenience foods or fast foods at meal time. One of the best ways to improve your health in the new year is to improve your diet. The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) “My Plate” program has helpful resources and tips if you aren’t sure where and how to begin.
  2. Start an exercise program: Another resolution to make in 2019 is to exercise 30 minutes each day. For weary caregivers, this might seem unrealistic. Research shows, however, that exercising in small increments can yield the same results as 30 continuous minutes of exercise. Setting a goal to exercise 15 minutes in the morning and 15 minutes in the evening may be more achievable.
  3. Schedule a physical: Caregivers often neglect their yearly physical and wellness screenings. Commit to scheduling an appointment with your primary care physician in January. They can evaluate your health status and help schedule routine screenings that might be due.
  4. Explore alternative therapies: Stress is a common part of a caregiver’s day. Set a goal to learn a few stress-management techniques in the new year. A few to consider are gardening, music, art, yoga, meditation, journaling, and Pilates.
  5. Laugh more: Caregivers can get so wrapped up in their role that they neglect caring for their spirit. Resolve to laugh more in 2019. Laughter helps lower blood pressure and prevent depression while also giving the spirit a boost. Whether it is a phone call with a funny friend, watching a television comedy, or enjoying a local improv theater, remind yourself that laughter is the best medicine.

Respite Care at Legacy Senior Living

A necessary part of taking care of a loved one is learning how important it is to take regular breaks. Maintaining your well-being will allow you the strength and fortitude you need to be a good caregiver.

Legacy Senior Living communities make that easier to do. Our respite services allow family caregivers to take a break knowing their loved one is safe and well cared for. Call us at (423) 478-8071 to learn more.

5 Ways to Help a Senior with Alzheimer’s Maintain Their Dignity

December 24, 2018

Learn how to help a senior with dementia maintain their dignity and quality of life.

Taking care of a loved one with Alzheimer’s, or another form of dementia, can be challenging. Learn how to help a senior with dementia maintain their dignity and quality of life.

Alzheimer’s is a disease that slowly robs people of their abilities. It’s sometimes referred to as “the long goodbye.” For spouses, adult children, and grandchildren, it is difficult to watch a loved one slip further and further away.

One challenge for families, as the disease progresses, is how to shelter an aging family member from a loss of dignity. As memory and communication skills become impaired, protecting an adult with Alzheimer’s becomes more difficult.

There are steps a family member can take to help a senior maintain his or her dignity and quality of life. Here are just a few.

5 Ways to Protect the Dignity of an Adult with Alzheimer’s

  1. Kind words still matter: When seniors lose their ability to verbally communicate, it might be easy to overlook how meaningful your words can still be to them. Though they may be unable to respond with words, it doesn’t mean you should stop saying phrases like “I love you” or “Good morning!” The kindness and love in your voice can help an aging family member feel safe and secure during this difficult time.
  2. Be mindful of troubling symptoms: Some forms of dementia, such as Lewy body dementia, can cause a senior to hallucinate. These hallucinations can be frightening and uncomfortable for them to experience and for you to witness. Hold their hand and talk softly to them when they are scared.
  3. Protect their privacy during personal care: If your loved one requires help with bathing and dressing, take extra steps to protect their privacy. While they may be unable to express it, they may feel embarrassed about needing assistance with personal care. Have a bathrobe waiting for them when they step out of the shower. Make casual conversation to distract them while dressing. Keep blinds and doors closed to protect their modesty.
  4. Celebrate life milestones: It might not seem worth the effort to celebrate birthdays and other milestones as your loved one’s disease progresses. This is especially true if you feel overwhelmed with the demands of caregiving. Try to make time anyway. While your loved one may not understand what is being celebrated, they will likely enjoy the companionship and smiling faces around them.
  5. Protect their quality of life: Alzheimer’s and closely related forms of dementia often cause seniors to withdraw and spend more time alone. Sometimes they may feel embarrassed at not understanding the conversations around them. At other times, they may feel overwhelmed by sadness. Plan activities that help seniors feel empowered and create environments that support their success. Try to do all you can to help them live their best quality of life.

It can be difficult to remain positive as you watch a loved one battle Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. We hope these tips help!

Memory Care Services at Legacy Senior Living

If you are struggling to manage the care of a senior loved one who has dementia, we can help. The Harbor, our memory care program, was designed to allow adults with memory loss an opportunity to live their best quality of life.

From specially-trained caregivers to purposeful day programming, no detail is overlooked. We invite you to schedule a private tour at your convenience to learn more!

Giving Seniors “Experience” Gifts this Holiday Season

December 17, 2018

Struggling to find a holiday gift for an older adult? An experience gift might be the solution. These ideas will help you get started.

Finding a meaningful holiday gift for a senior loved one isn’t always easy. Many seem to have everything they want and need already. If an older adult has moved to a senior living community, they may have limited space for storing belongings and seasonal items.

What can you do to show an older adult your love and gratitude this holiday season?

As we grow older, family gatherings and the gift of time often take on new meaning. An experience gift might be the ideal solution this year.

The Gift of Time This Holiday Season

Unlike the tangible gifts typically given during the holidays, experience gifts involve spending time together. Here are a few suggestions to help you come up with an experience gift for your senior loved one.

  • Pampering time: Schedule some spa time for the ladies in the family to enjoy together. Whether during or after the holidays, a spa day can give everyone a chance to relax and recharge. Most salons offer a variety of options ranging from pedicures and manicures to facials and makeovers.
  • Movie night: Start a new tradition. Sometime during the holiday season, plan a move night for everyone in the family. New movies often debut in theatres around the holidays, so there should be a variety of family-friendly movies to consider. If going out isn’t an option, host a movie night at home. This can be just as much fun. Show a holiday movie that several generations of the family can enjoy together, such as The Grinch Who Stole Christmas or Home Alone.
  • Talent show: While this idea might take a bit more time, it can be fun for everyone involved. Organize a talent show and encourage family members to participate in some way. Designate one or two outgoing loved ones to emcee the event. Those who are more reserved can help with planning if they prefer. Faraway family members, who can’t be there in person, can video their talent to be played during the event.
  • Sports night: Another idea for a senior who is a sports fan is to organize an outing to watch a local team. From minor league baseball to major league basketball, sports events are fun for people of all ages. Whether it’s a Saturday afternoon or a weeknight, varying times can make it easier on family schedules. If the senior has a mobility challenge, most arenas can make accommodations if you call ahead.
  • Craft party: Working on craft projects is another fun way for several generations to spend time together. While many of them don’t require special talents, the different generations may teach each other new skills. You can purchase craft kits at a local hobby store. These can range from bird houses to handprint garden stones and stained-glass sun catchers.

The idea behind experience gifts is to find ways for families to spend time making memories.

Stay On Top of the Latest News on Aging

If you haven’t already done so, take a minute to bookmark the Legacy Senior Living blog and check back often. From fire safety to flu-shot myths, we share new information and resources every week!

Tour Assisted Living during the Holidays

December 10, 2018

 

Tax deductions for Senior Care

The holiday season can be a great time to tour assisted living communities with a senior loved one. Here’s what families should know and consider.

If you and a senior loved one have been discussing a move to an assisted living community in the new year, the holidays can be an ideal time to start touring. While some families might be reluctant to broach this subject during the holiday season, there are reasons why they should.

Assisted living communities, like those at Legacy Senior Living, give older adults the support they need to live their best quality of life. An excellent way to learn more about these communities is by visiting in person.

5 Reasons to Visit Assisted Living Communities during the Holidays

Here are a few of the many reasons you and your aging loved one should make time to visit assisted living communities this holiday season:

  1. The halls are decked: Most assisted living communities go all out decorating for the holidays. Residents and their families usually participate in the fun which brings a festive atmosphere to the community.
  2. Seasonal activities abound: While assisted living communities are known for offering life-enrichment activities and wellness programs all year, the holidays are especially inviting. Local youth groups and community organizations often join forces with the staff to host choir programs, music concerts, open houses, game nights, and more. Potential residents can join the fun and get an inside look at what it’s like to live there.
  3. Visiting family can participate: Long-distance family members are often in town during the holiday season. Touring assisted living communities with extended family can give everyone a chance to ask questions and learn more about the options.
  4. Talk with resident families: Family members of residents often visit in greater numbers during the holiday season. This gives you an opportunity to ask them questions about their satisfaction with the community’s care and services. Their insight can be invaluable as you and your loved one try to make an informed decision.
  5. Beat the January rush: January is one of the busiest months of the year for assisted living communities. Families who have put off making this decision often feel a sense of urgency after spending time with a senior loved one during the holidays. Visiting in December allows staff members to spend more time giving tours and answering questions. It will also give your family member first pick of the apartments or suites that are available.

Before visiting your first community, take time to create a list of questions to ask during your tour. Making an informed choice depends on asking the right questions and being satisfied with the answers you receive. “5 Questions to Ask on a Senior Living Community Tour” can help you get your list started!

Is the Senior Driver in Your Family Safe Behind the Wheel?

December 3, 2018

Concerned about senior driver safety? This information will help you objectively assess their skills.

The topic of driving safety can be a contentious one between seniors and those who love them. For many, driving represents independence. Knowing you can hop in your car and head out to appointments and errands allows most of us to feel empowered and in control of our lives.

Unfortunately, aging brings undeniable physical changes, some of which can make driving more difficult. In honor of Older Driver Safety Awareness Week, here are some tips that adult children should know about safety and senior drivers.

Assessing an Older Driver Skills

Adult children sometimes use age as the only factor in determining if a parent is safe behind the wheel. There is evidence to show that age does play a role in driving safety. Senior driver research confirms that fatal accidents begin to rise around the age of 75 and spike significantly at the age of 80.

But age shouldn’t be the primary determinant of driving safety. While aging does cause physical changes, not everyone ages the same. An active 80-year-old may be a safer, better driver than a 60-year-old who lives with a serious health condition.

A few, more objective ways to evaluate an older loved one’s fitness for driving include:

  1. Condition of the vehicle: An older driver’s car can tell a story. Is your senior loved one’s car in good physical shape? Do you see scrapes on the side mirrors and side panels or dents in the fenders? A close inspection of the vehicle can help you spot potential concerns.

Sometimes a senior driver might have a problem with depth perception and not realize it. They may be bumping in to things because they don’t realize how close they are.

  1. Conduct a ride along: Adult children and younger family members often act as a senior’s driver when they head out together. This might keep them from realizing how much the older adult’s driving skills have deteriorated.

Try to discreetly arrange a ride along to see how well the senior performs behind the wheel of their car. It will help to do this during busy traffic times, at dusk, or after dark. Consider the following questions as you observe your loved one’s driving skills.

Is the senior too confident or overly anxious while driving? Are they adhering to the rules of the road? Is looking behind them or over their shoulder difficult or even painful? Are they keeping up with traffic or going too fast or too slow? Each of these factors can impact their safety on the road.

  1. Safe driver evaluation: You can also take advantage of more formal senior-driver safety evaluations. The American Automobile Association (AAA) has a free self-rating tool titled Drivers 65 Plus. This brochure includes 15 questions designed to assess an older adult’s driving skills. If you prefer an in-person approach, a professional driving specialist might be the answer. You can search the American Occupational Therapy Association’s driving specialist database to find a professional near you.

A final suggestion is to make sure your senior loved one has an annual eye exam. Vision loss is more common as we age and can have a significant impact on older driver safety.

Transportation Services at Legacy Senior Living

If your senior loved one decides it is time to hang up the car keys, exploring transportation options together should be a priority. At Legacy Senior Living communities, transportation is one of our most popular services.

Whether it is transportation for a group outing or for a physician appointment, we make it easy for residents to stay connected. Call the Legacy community nearest you to learn more!

Holiday Gifts for an Adult with Alzheimer’s

November 26, 2018

If you are having a tough time coming up with holiday gifts for a loved one with Alzheimer’s or dementia, you’ll likely find this guide to be of help.

If you are struggling to come up with a holiday gift idea for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease or a similar form of dementia, know that you aren’t alone. Families want to include senior loved ones in holiday traditions like gift giving while also keeping their safety in mind.

That’s why we created this simple holiday gift guide. We hope it will help spark some ideas for a present that will bring joy to your senior family member.

Holiday Gift Ideas for Adults with Alzheimer’s and Dementia

  1. Music: Music has therapeutic benefits, especially for people with memory loss. It can be soothing, calming, or uplifting depending upon the type of music. As a holiday gift, you can purchase an iPod (or even an iPad) and download some of your loved one’s favorite songs. Vinyl record players are also gaining in popularity again. You could buy one along with a few vinyl records of your senior loved one’s favorite artists from youth.
  2. For the birds: If you are the caregiver or family member of an adult with Alzheimer’s, you may have noticed how captivated they are by birds. Whether it is watching birds build a nest, have lunch at the bird feeder, or enjoy a dip in the bird bath, research shows that people with dementia find peace and comfort in birdwatching. The National Audubon Society launched a special initiative, Bird Tales, to help educate people on the role birding can play in improving the lives of people with Alzheimer’s. Depending upon your loved one’s living situation, you can buy a bird feeder and bird food for them to enjoy. If space doesn’t allow for that, you can purchase a bird feeder that attaches directly to window glass. From the comfort of their living room, seniors can watch the birds eat.
  3. Comfort clothing: As Alzheimer’s disease progresses, it can cause problems with mobility, dexterity, and coordination. This makes it more difficult for people to manage personal care needs independently. You can help by purchasing clothes that are easier to get on and off. Jogging suits, shirts that zip up the front (instead of buttons), jeans with an elastic waistband, and sneakers with a Velcro closure make it easier for a senior with a physical impairment to dress on their own.
  4. Fidget blanket: Another holiday gift that can reduce agitation and anxiety in an adult with Alzheimer’s is a fidget blanket. These are tactile blankets that have ribbons, bows, buttons, hooks, family photos, and more attached. For an adult struggling with anxiety or agitation, having a blanket or quilt with fidget activities built in keeps their hands busy. You can find a variety of sellers on Etsy and a list of people who make fidget quilts on Alzheimer’s Support. If you are crafty and want to make one of your own, you will find instructions on the Patchwork Posse website.

We hope this guide helps you find the perfect holiday gift for your senior loved one.

The Talk: Discussing the Need for Memory Care during the Holidays

The holiday season is generally a time of year when families are reunited. It can provide you with an opportunity to talk about your senior loved one’s care needs now and in the days ahead. Memory care might be a solution that helps your loved one safely live their best quality of life.

We invite you and your family to visit the Legacy Senior Living community nearest you. Our dedicated memory care program, The Harbor, is committed to helping adults with dementia live their best quality of life at every stage of the disease. Call us today to schedule a private tour.