Managing High Blood Pressure During Summer Humidity

August 6, 2018

5 steps to preventing a humidity-related health crisis

Summer heat and humidity can be especially dangerous to people with high blood pressure. Here’s what seniors and caregivers should know.

Many of us are aware that weather can play a role in triggering certain health problems. Seniors who suffer from arthritis symptoms, for example, often say winter leaves them feeling tough. Older adults who like to spend time outdoors working in the garden usually realize they need to be careful not to become dehydrated. But people aren’t often aware of the danger associated with high humidity and high blood pressure.

Research shows that high humidity can have serious health consequences for people with high blood pressure and heart disease. For those who live in southern climates, that’s important to know.

As part of Legacy Senior Living’s commitment to quality care for older adults, we are sharing this information for family caregivers to review.

The Connection Between High Humidity and High Blood Pressure

Experts say risk begins to rise when the outside temperature is over 70 degrees and the humidity is at 70 percent or greater. That’s because high humidity and hot temperatures cause the heart to work harder. In fact, the body might need to circulate twice as much blood per minute to remain cool than it does on an average day.

The problem is when there is too much moisture in the air, also known as high humidity, the body has a difficult time sweating enough. While most of us think of sweating as a nuisance, it’s important because it helps cool the body down. Excessive sweating also increases the risk for dehydration because it lowers the amount of fluid in the body. That places even greater strain on the heart.

Who Is Most at Risk for Illnesses Related to Heat and Humidity?

Though heat and humidity can be dangerous to people of all ages, some factors make adults even more vulnerable to a heat-related crisis:

  • People age 50 and over
  • Adults with heart, lung, and kidney problems
  • Seniors who follow a low-salt or low-sodium diet
  • People who have a circulatory disease or problems with circulation
  • Adults who take diuretics, sedatives, and blood-pressure medication

Warning Signs Caregivers Should Learn to Recognize

If you are a senior or the caregiver for one, it’s important to take a few minutes to review and learn the warning signs of heat- and humidity-related illnesses:

  • Confusion
  • Dizziness
  • Disorientation
  • Rapid pulse
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea
  • Excessive sweating or an inability to sweat
  • Cold, clammy skin
  • Muscle cramps or spasms
  • Swelling in extremities

If you or a loved one are exhibiting more than one or two of these symptoms, it’s important to seek medical intervention immediately. In most cases, that means calling 911 for help.

5 Steps to Preventing a Humidity-Related Health Crisis

Here are a few steps you can take that may help you or a senior loved one avoid a heat- or humidity-related medical crisis:

  1. Stay hydrated: Drink plenty of water and consume foods that have high water content such as cucumber, melon, berries, leafy greens, and tomatoes.
  2. Avoid mid-day heat: Heat and humidity usually reach their peak between noon and 4:00 pm. Schedule errands, chores, and outings around those times whenever possible.
  3. Wear a hat: Invest in a natural fiber hat with a brim that shields the face.
  4. Eat smart: Avoid caffeinated foods and beverages, as well as alcohol. They can contribute to dehydration and increase the odds of a heat-related crisis.
  5. Apply sunscreen: Many people fail to apply sunscreen or don’t apply it often enough. This can lead to sunburn or even a more serious case of sun poisoning. Follow the directions on the sunscreen bottle closely and apply it any time you will be outdoors or riding in a car.

For more articles and resources on health and safety topics for seniors, we encourage you to bookmark the Legacy Blog and stop back often. We share new resources every week!

A Commitment to Caring at Legacy Senior Living

July 23, 2018

Learn how team members are celebrated and rewarded at Legacy Senior Living communities throughout the Southeast.

At Legacy Senior Living communities throughout the Southeast, you will find dedicated teams of caregivers committed to providing our residents with the highest quality of care and service. We strive to treat all residents with honor, respect, faith, and integrity no matter what their needs or circumstances. That means we support those residents with active, independent lifestyles, as well as those who require special care.

Because we believe that how well we treat caregivers will be reflected in how well they treat our residents, we established programs that recognize and honor the work of our caregivers and support team members.

Honoring the Caregivers Who Support Our Residents

Here are just a few of the ways we reward our team members:

  • “Going the Extra Mile”: Through this program, we reward our caregivers monthly, quarterly, and annually. From monetary incentives to professional training opportunities, our goal is to honor team members who go the extra mile for residents and colleagues. In May of 2018, Ashley Ford from our Grace Senior Living community in Douglasville, Georgia, was named the Legacy Champion of the Year. She was chosen for this honor from nearly 500 eligible team members. Her commitment to going the extra mile in every aspect of her professional career makes her a popular employee with residents, colleagues, and family members.
  • Legacy Rewards: Employees at Legacy communities earn points for exhibiting positive behaviors, such as good attendance, length of service, on-time track record, and more. These points can be redeemed for gift cards or merchandise through our Legacy Rewards program.
  • Legacy Cares Fund: Because we know life often comes with unexpected ups and downs, we created the Legacy Care Fund. It is designed to provide financial assistance to employees who experience a hardship. Employees can contribute to the fund, as well as receive support during a crisis.

Legacy Senior Living Serves Seniors in the Southeast

With more than a dozen campuses throughout the Southeast, we are pleased to share that Legacy Senior Living is routinely recognized as the best in senior living in the areas we serve. This recognition is evidence that when you treat employees well, they will provide the quality of care residents and their families desire.

We invite you to contact the Legacy community nearest to you or your senior loved one to set up a private tour at your earliest convenience!

Why Do Adults with Alzheimer’s Wander?

July 16, 2018

Why do seniors with Alzheimer’s wander

If you are the caregiver for a family member who has Alzheimer’s, this information will help you learn more about the potential causes of wandering.

In our effort to help raise awareness about Alzheimer’s, we devote time to community outreach in the local areas we serve. A question Legacy team members are frequently asked is why people with Alzheimer’s wander. It is a behavior that causes families considerable stress and worry.

When adults with Alzheimer’s wander, they can become lost and unable to find their way home. It may even put their lives in danger. Seniors with memory loss easily forget their address—or even their name—which makes it tough for people to help them return home.

Unfortunately, wandering is common in people with this disease. Research shows that as many as 6 in 10 people with Alzheimer’s will wander. Understanding what causes this behavior is critical to helping loved ones prevent it.

Common Reasons Adults with Alzheimer’s Wander

As is true of so many things related to Alzheimer’s disease, researchers aren’t sure what causes wandering. They do, however, believe they understand some of the potential causes:

  • Unmet needs: Of all the possibilities for wandering, most experts agree this is an important one. They believe seniors with Alzheimer’s wander in search of a solution to an unmet need. The older adult might be hungry, thirsty, in need of the bathroom, or experiencing undiagnosed pain.
  • Unfamiliar surroundings: For adults with Alzheimer’s, memory loss can make once familiar surroundings look unfamiliar. Everything and everyone seems foreign to them. The senior may wander in an attempt to find something that looks familiar. If your senior loved one has moved into your home, try to make sure some of their most familiar belongings—a throw, a chair, and family pictures—are strategically placed throughout the home.
  • Former Work Routines: A senior with Alzheimer’s may think they are still working and try to leave home to head off to work. Once they are outdoors, they might become disoriented and get lost. Keeping the senior busy at home with work such as dusting furniture, folding the laundry, or watering plants can help give them purpose and prevent wandering.
  • Unfamiliar faces: Because short-term memory is lost first, seniors with Alzheimer’s might remember friends and family as being younger and looking differently than they do today. They might leave home in search of people they know.
  • Chaotic or noisy environment: Alzheimer’s causes damage to the brain and makes it more difficult for people to process things around them. This is especially true in a busy environment. When the home is busy or noisy, the senior might become agitated and wander to get away from the chaos.

Pay Attention to Wandering Patterns

To better manage a senior’s tendency to wander, pay attention to patterns in their behavior.

  • Are there certain times of day when they attempt to wander more? If so, write down what is happening in their world at that time. You might start to notice triggers that make them more likely to try to leave.
  • If your loved one is still able to communicate verbally, ask them why they are trying to leave. Document and track their responses to look for patterns.
  • Do certain environments make them more prone to disorientation and wandering?

Secure Care for Adults with Alzheimer’s

If you are struggling to keep an adult with Alzheimer’s safe at home, it might be time to consider the support of a memory care community. At Legacy Senior Living, we offer dedicated memory care programming in Virginia, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Tennessee.

With benefits ranging from a secure environment to home-cooked meals, we extend an open invitation to you and your family to visit and learn more.

6 Tips for Talking about Assisted Living with a Senior

July 9, 2018

6 tips for talking about assisted living

If you’ve been putting it off or if the conversation is one you will soon need to have, here are 6 tips for talking about Assisted Living from Legacy Senior Living.

Talking with a parent about moving to assisted living isn’t always easy. In fact, adult children who call our Legacy Senior Living communities often say that the very idea of initiating this conversation with an aging parent makes them uncomfortable. Some put it off until a medical emergency or other crisis occurs. The senior’s family is then forced to make a quick decision in the midst of an already-stressful time.

To help ensure your parent has time to make an informed choice, it’s best to plan ahead.

Tips for Talking about Assisted Living

To help lay the groundwork for an eventual move, it may help to begin to slowly introduce the many benefits of assisted living communities. From support with daily routines to housekeeping and maintenance, an assisted living community frees seniors from the burdens of home ownership.

An assisted living community also offers a wide variety of life enrichment, wellness, and social activities. This connection helps seniors live a more active and vibrant life at every age.

Some additional tips for talking about assisted living with your senior loved one include:

  • Introducing the topic in indirect ways: Think about how you can broach the subject of assisted living in more indirect ways. Has your senior loved one recently had a friend move to a senior living community? Ask how they are doing and mention that you’d like to visit them. Is there an event coming up at an assisted living community near you? Suggest you both attend together. Ensuring your family member sees an assisted living community in person can help overcome any myths and stigmas they may have about senior living communities.
  • Being mindful of your language: Avoid using phrases that can appear to be too bossy or forceful, such as “you need to,” or “you have to.” Instead, adopt a softer approach. Ask open-ended questions to gauge how your loved one is feeling and what their concerns and fears about this type of change might be. It will help them to feel more in control of the process and their future, and will allow you to better understand their point of view.
  • Sharing your fears and hopes: Share the worries you have about your loved one’s health and safety in a kind, respectful way. It might be a concern they will fall and not be able to call for help, or that their home will be targeted by criminals who recognize a senior lives there alone. Also share how you think assisted living will benefit them, such as a safe environment and the wide variety of life enrichment activities that are available. Let them know your hope is for them to live their highest quality of life and that you believe an assisted living community is the best way to do that.

What to Do If You Encounter Resistance

Be prepared to encounter resistance, at least early on. Remember, just because you are ready for your loved one to make this move doesn’t mean they are. Tread lightly so you don’t put your senior loved one on the defensive. Even though their health may be declining, they still need to feel they are in control of their own life.

Here are a few more tips for talking about assisted living in the face of resistance:

  • Respect their feelings: If your loved one is resisting, it might be necessary to drop the subject for a while. Continuing to push them may cause them to dig in and refuse to move. Unless you are fearful for their safety, put the topic on the back burner for a few weeks.
  • Bring in backup: Is there someone in your family or one of your loved one’s medical professionals who they respect and look up to? Enlisting their help in this discussion might be another option. It might be their primary care physician who knows their health is declining or a pastor who understands the benefits offered by assisted living communities. Think about who has influence and would be willing to assist.
  • Encourage a tour: Ask your senior loved one to consider taking a tour of at least one or two assisted living communities. Agree they are under no obligation to move, but are touring just to learn more about all of the benefits. It might help if you visit communities ahead of time to screen out those that aren’t likely to be a good fit. Then choose two you think might best meet your loved one’s needs and bring them for a visit.

Legacy Senior Living communities welcome visitors for tours and lunch every day! One of our experienced team members will be happy to answer all of your questions about assisted living and show you firsthand how passionate we are about delivering quality care, exceptional service, professional support, and compassionate friendship to our residents and their family members. Call us today to set up a private visit.

Stay Independent at Every Age

July 3, 2018

Stay independent at every age

In honor of Independence Day, Legacy Senior Living shares tips to help older adults stay independent at every age.

Maintaining independence is important to adults of any age, including seniors. Having the ability to manage a household, come and go as you please, and remain self-sufficient is something older adults often cite as their goal for retirement.

What can seniors do to protect their independence?

As we celebrate Independence Day and our nation’s birth, we have a few tips you and the seniors in your life may find helpful for remaining independent.

Checklist of Tips to Help Seniors Stay Independent

Here are a few suggestions you can use to stay safe, healthy, and independent during retirement:

  • Conduct a safety audit of the home or hire a physical or occupational therapist to do so. Creating a safe environment can help you avoid disabling falls and other hazards that might be lurking in your home.
  • Make exercise a priority. Physical fitness is one of the keys to a long, healthy, and independent life. Walking, swimming, practicing chair yoga, and biking are all low-impact forms of exercise. Also try to work strength training in a few days a week. Go4Life, a senior fitness program from the National Institute on Aging at NIH, has great resources to help you get started.
  • Eat a well-balanced diet that takes into consideration how nutritional needs change with age. My Plate from the United States Department of Agriculture is a helpful tool you can use to plan menus.
  • Follow your doctor’s orders. Whether it is scheduling routine health screenings, like a mammogram or cholesterol test, or a mandate to work on lowering your stress level, listening to your physician is important for protecting independence.
  • Stay engaged with your social network and greater community. Isolation is a known health risk for older adults. It can lead to diabetes, depression, obesity, and more. You can maintain your health and your independence by staying socially connected. It could be by volunteering, joining a club, taking a class, or just regularly spending time with family and friends.
  • Nurturing the spirit also helps older adults maintain independence. That doesn’t have to mean being part of a religious organization. Some seniors find communing with nature through hobbies, such as bird-watching or gardening, keeps them connected with their spirit.
  • Give your brain an aerobic workout every day. Hobbies like arts, crafts, and music promote cognitive health. Taking classes, reading, writing, and exploring new challenges do as well. By keeping your brain healthy, you can live a more independent lifestyle longer.

Independent Living at Legacy Senior Living

Residents in independent living at Concordia of Bella Vista in northwest Arkansas, Renaissance Marquis in Rome, Georgia, and Heritage Place at Legacy Retirement Village in Cleveland, Tennessee, enjoy the benefits of an active living community. Because the chores and repairs associated with home ownership are handled by staff, residents are free to explore new passions and interests or reconnect with old ones.

We invite you to call the community nearest you to schedule a private tour to learn more about living independently at every age!

Emotions Linger Long After Memories Fade

June 25, 2018

Caregivers often wonder about a senior with Alzheimer’s emotions.

Caregivers often wonder about a senior with Alzheimer’s emotions. Do emotions linger after memory fails?

If a senior in your family has Alzheimer’s disease or a similar form of dementia, you might wonder how they are feeling and how much their daily life is impacted by their environment. As the disease progresses and communication skills become more impaired, both things can be difficult to assess.

While dementia experts long believed that people with even more advanced Alzheimer’s and dementia were still capable of experiencing sadness and joy, there wasn’t any conclusive evidence to prove it. That’s why a study conducted at the University of Iowa is so important.

This research was designed to evaluate whether or not emotions linger after memory fails. That’s essential in helping create positive, productive days for adults with dementia.

A Clinical Study of Alzheimer’s, Emotions, and Memory

This study looked at 34 older adults who were split into two groups: one group had early Alzheimer’s disease and the other group was considered to be healthy.

Researchers started by asking each participant how they were feeling and documenting their responses. Once a baseline for their emotional status was set, they proceeded to the next part of the study. This consisted of showing participants eight movie and television scenes considered to be sad. Five minutes after participants were done viewing the scenes, researchers asked each participant what they remembered and how they were feeling. They repeated these questions after 15 minutes and then again 30 minutes later.

After a five-minute rest break, the study resumed.

This time around, researchers showed movie and television clips they believed would induce feelings of joy and happiness. After they were done, participants were asked the same sequence of follow-up questions.

The study seemed to indicate that even though the participants with Alzheimer’s couldn’t remember what they watched in the clips, they did remember how those movie and television scenes made them feel. Their memories were gone, but the emotions lingered. Unfortunately, sadness is the emotion that appears to last the longest.

While this study was a small one, it offers preliminary support for the need to create meaningful days and a positive environment for adults with Alzheimer’s.

The Purposeful Day at Legacy

At Legacy Senior Living, we work hard to ensure that every day is filled with purpose and meaning for our dementia residents. The music, arts, and crafts programs we offer all help residents with memory loss feel successful. Another way we promote meaningful days is with The Simple C storyboard.

This vital part of our dementia care residents’ day provides non-medicated therapies that focus on and honor each resident’s personal story. Working with residents’ families, we select stories and pictures that are meaningful to them.

We also take time to learn more about each resident’s life and hobbies before the disease. This helps us to incorporate those interests into each resident’s plan of care.

Another technique we use is to record trusted voices (friends, family members, and others important to the resident) to use in memory stimulation and to provide verbal reminders for activities of daily living.

Clinical trials show that Simple C offers a variety of benefits:

  • Decreases agitation and anxiety
  • Lowers the risk of wandering
  • Prevents or helps manage incontinence
  • Helps residents overcome sleep challenges common in dementia

Read more about these non-medicated therapies or call us to set up a time to visit a Legacy community near you.

Senior Care 101: Understanding the Different Types of Care and Support for Older Adults

June 20, 2018

Senior Care 101

Here’s Senior Care 101. Learn more about the different types of senior living, independent living, assisted living, and memory care.

If you are considering a move to a senior living community or helping an older family member explore their options, understanding the difference between each type of senior care isn’t always easy. But the distinctions are important. Making the best decision requires learning more about each type of care, as well as the services and amenities offered.

3 Distinct Levels of Senior Living

At Legacy Senior Living communities, there are three distinct levels of care:

  • Independent living for the more active senior
  • Assisted living for an older adult who needs a little support
  • Memory care for adults with dementia

In many instances, an older adult chooses to move to a senior living community when they are active and independent. This allows them to take advantage of the community’s life enrichment and wellness programs.

As the resident’s needs for care change, they are able to move through the care continuum to receive assisted living or memory care support.

What is Independent Living?

Independent living communities are designed to provide active older adults with an option for a lifestyle that is free from the burdens of home ownership. This gives them time to travel, take continuing education classes, volunteer, pursue new hobbies, and reconnect with old friends.

Independent living community residents enjoy and benefit from the following services and amenities:

  • Choice of apartments and floor plans
  • From repairing the oven to mowing the lawn, all home maintenance and repairs are handled for residents
  • Social, recreational, and educational activities to participate in every day
  • Peace of mind that comes from knowing security is onsite 24/7
  • Delicious, well-balanced meals served restaurant style in the dining room
  • Wellness programs designed to help residents live longer, healthier lives
  • Access to assisted living and dementia care if the need arises

The Support of an Assisted Living Community

Assisted living residents benefit from the privacy of their own apartment combined with the care and support they need always close by.

In addition to a comfortable apartment, assisted living residents benefit from the following:

  • An individual plan of care created for each resident based on their unique needs and struggles
  • Around-the-clock caregivers to provide assistance with daily activities such as bathing, dressing, grooming, and toileting
  • Robust calendar of life enrichment activities, wellness programs, and community outings
  • All housekeeping, maintenance, and daily linens provided
  • Utilities, basic cable television, and local phone service included
  • Transportation for community outings, errands, and appointments

Memory Care for Adults With Dementia

Memory care communities are designed to help adults with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia live their best quality of life despite their disease. Caregivers are trained to support a resident’s remaining abilities, helping them feel more independent and empowered.

Here are a few of the services and amenities found in Legacy’s memory care communities, known as The Harbor:

  • A safe and secure environment designed to prevent resident wandering
  • Specialized caregivers who understand the unique needs of adults with dementia
  • Nutritious meals served in an environment that minimizes distractions
  • Life enrichment activities and wellness programs that help people with dementia feel successful
  • Laundry and housekeeping services
  • Unique therapy programs, such as The Purposeful Day and Simple C, that help residents live their best life every day

Schedule a Private Visit Today

If you have questions about what type of care is best for you or an older adult in your family, or if you would like to schedule a private tour, please call the Legacy Senior Living community nearest you today!

5 Summer Safety Tips for Seniors

June 12, 2018

5 Summer Safety Tips for Seniors

Summer heat can present health risks for older adults. Follow these 5 summer safety tips to keep an older adult in your family safe.

As we prepare to welcome the first day of summer on June 21st, we want to take time to share a few safety tips. While most of us enjoy spending time outdoors during the summer months, it’s important to remember that the heat and humidity commonly found in the south can be especially dangerous for older adults.

Here are a few tips caregivers can use to keep seniors in the family safe.

5 Ways to Help a Senior Loved One Stay Safe This Summer

  1. Know the risks of heat and humidity
    Each year extreme heat causes an estimated 658 deaths. Older adults are at higher risk for heat-related illnesses because our bodies lose some of their ability to process extreme temperatures as we age. Certain medications and health conditions—such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma—may also worsen during the heat of the summer.Talk with your senior loved one’s physician for advice about managing a chronic health condition during the summer months. Also be sure to review the older adult’s medication list to see if any are impacted by heat or humidity.
  2. Take sun safety precautions
    This generation of older adults didn’t grow up wearing sunscreen. As a result, they don’t always follow good sun safety practices. Encourage your senior loved one to apply a sunscreen with an SPF of 30 any time they are outdoors or riding in a car. This helps to reduce their risk of developing skin cancer. Wearing a long-sleeve shirt and long pants in a lightweight, breathable fabric can also help block the sun, as can a hat and sunglasses.
  3. Stay out of the mid-day sun
    The sun is strongest between the hours of 10 AM and 2 PM. Remind the older adults in your life to plan errands, appointments, and outdoor activities around these peak sun times.Also make sure your senior loved one has a safe, cool place to get out of the summer heat. If their home isn’t air conditioned, create a list of local malls, senior centers, coffee shops, bookstores, and movie theaters they can visit that are.
  4. Encourage hydration
    Drinking water is another step necessary to stay safe during the summer heat. Most health professionals recommend drinking eight glasses a day, more if an adult is sweating or swimming.Encourage your senior loved one to keep a supply of cold water in their refrigerator and a bottle of it by their side all day.
  1. Watch for symptoms of a heat-related illness
    Make sure you and other loved ones know the early warning signs of a heat-related illness A few of the most common ones include confusion, pale skin, nausea, vomiting, dark urine, dizziness, fatigue, headache, rapid pulse, and diarrhea. Seek medical help immediately if you or a senior in your life exhibit these symptoms.

Follow the Legacy Senior Living Blog

To continue learning more about healthy aging, caregiving, and other aging-related issues, we encourage you to bookmark The Legacy Senior Living Blog and stop back often.

5 Therapeutic Benefits of Gardening During Retirement

June 7, 2018

Therapeutic Benefits of Gardening

Gardening offers therapeutic benefits for people of all ages and that includes active seniors and adults with dementia. Digging in the dirt helps to nurture and heal the body, mind, and spirit.

In honor of National Gardening Week, celebrated from June 3rd through June 9th, we are sharing a few of the therapeutic benefits associated with gardening during retirement years.

5 Ways Gardening Keeps Seniors Healthier

  1. Reduce stress and manage anxiety: Research published in the Journal of Health Psychology revealed that gardening can decrease cortisol levels in the brain. Cortisol is known as the body’s “stress hormone.” When you are feeling anxious and stressed, cortisol levels often rise. Seniors can combat that increase by spending time digging in the dirt.
  2. Improve stamina and physical fitness: Gardening can be a real workout. It improves flexibility, range of motion, strength, and overall stamina. The best part of it is that gardening can be adapted to meet a senior’s physical abilities. Raised beds, window boxes, vertical gardens, and container gardens are all safer forms of gardening for seniors. Even these lighter forms of exercise can help you stay healthier.
  3. Connect with nature and boost mood: Communing with nature and soaking up the sun’s rays can increase serotonin levels in the brain. Serotonin is the chemical that boosts mood and soothes the spirit. Remember to protect yourself by wearing sunscreen, a hat, and sunglasses before you head outside.
  4. Reduce dementia risk: A growing amount of research indicates that gardening may lower a senior’s risk for developing dementia by as much as 36%. Experts believe the meditative qualities of gardening help reduce stress, which many consider a risk factor for dementia. Staying active also helps senior gardeners avoid some of the dangers linked to a sedentary lifestyle and higher risk of dementia, such as diabetes and high blood pressure.
  5. Boost the immune system: Without a doubt, gardening is dirty work. But all that dirt may actually strengthen the body’s immunity. Studies have shown that a type of bacteria often found in garden soil—mycobacterium vaccae—boosts the immune system. This friendly form of bacteria might help reduce symptoms caused by seasonal allergies and asthma.

Gardening Opportunities at Legacy Senior Living

At Legacy communities throughout the south, we make gardening easier and safer for seniors. Residents at each of our communities can create vertical gardens using Juice Plus+® Tower Gardens.

See what Mary Katherine Fordham, an assisted living resident at Legacy Village of Jacksonville, has to say about being able to safely continue her hobby of gardening. She maintains three tower gardens using a process known as aeroponics. Visit the Legacy community nearest you to learn more!

Honoring Our Emergency Responders

May 21, 2018

National EMS Week

This week of May is National EMS Week. Learn more about this celebration and an initiative designed to help people learn how to react during a medical crisis.

Emergencies happen when we least expect them. Sometimes it’s a car accident on the way to work that results in an injury. Other times it might be a child who is hurt playing in the yard. For older adults, however, falls around the home are the leading cause of disability and one of the top reasons seniors end up in a hospital emergency room.

When the unexpected happens, most of us rely on 911 for help.

In Legacy Senior Living communities, first responders are called on to transport residents to local hospitals when emergency health problems arise. The quick response from Emergency Medical Services (EMS) combined with the support of our own experienced care team members helps residents receive the emergency medical intervention they need.

National EMS week kicks off on May 20th this year. It is a time to thank our first responders for all they do to keep our communities safe. It is also a time to raise awareness of how to react during a medical crisis.

The History of EMS Week

EMS Strong: Stronger Together is the theme for this year’s week-long celebration. National EMS Week is an effort coordinated by the American College of Emergency Physicians and the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. EMS Week dates back to an initiative signed by President Gerald R. Ford. This week-long campaign focuses on education, awareness, and recruitment.

One area emergency physicians want people to pay special attention to is what everyday citizens can do to help someone in distress while they are waiting for first responders. The program is called Until Help Arrives.

What to Do Before Help Arrives

The Until Help Arrives program was created to encourage and empower the public to react calmly and methodically when they are in the midst of a life-threatening crisis.

The five-step program includes the following:

  1. Call 911
  2. Protect the injured from harm
  3. Stop bleeding
  4. Position people so they can breathe
  5. Provide comfort

Along these same lines is a public awareness effort to encourage people to learn how to calmly, safely, and efficiently perform CPR. Everyone from babysitters to family caregivers can benefit from learning how to perform this life-saving procedure.

Your local chapter of the American Red Cross is typically the best resource for locating a CPR workshop.

Visit a Legacy Community Today

If an older adult in your life is struggling to stay safe at home, the support of an assisted living community might be an ideal solution. The senior can receive the support they need to remain independent. Call the Legacy community nearest you to set up a time to visit and learn more.